CES 2016: Super-fast Internet is coming to your phone line

“Today, you have a choice between cable broadband Internet, which is expensive, or DSL Internet over your phone line, which is slow,” David Goldman reports for CNNMoney.

“But soon, a new technology will be coming to your home that will offer Google Fiber-like speeds right over your phone line,” Goldman reports. “It’s called G.Fast, and Israeli chipmaker Sckipio is showing off the powerful technology at CES this year.”

“In a demonstration for CNNMoney, Sckipio showed off download speeds of nearly 750 megabits per second traveling over a standard phone line. That’s 50 times faster than the broadband that you probably have coming into your home right now,” Goldman reports. “Sckipio says the G.Fast technology will debut in the United States later this year.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Where do we sign?

19 Comments

  1. ““In a demonstration for CNNMoney, Sckipio showed off download speeds of nearly 750 megabits per second traveling over a standard phone line. That’s 50 times faster than the broadband that you probably have coming into your home right now ”

    So what, the broadband providers will still cap your data. It all about nickel and dimeing you to take as much of your money as possible. This is why Apple needs to start getting into the broadband game like Google.

  2. Having had a 1 gig symmetrical fiber connection for the past year (with the lesser evil of two monopolists here in Seattle) I’ve discovered that these speeds aren’t all they’re cracked up to be. The sites serving out data rarely allow me to take full advantage of my big pipe. I still can’t play YouTube videos at 2170p without buffering. Netflix and iTunes movie downloads are fast but they’re not blindingly so. Friends ask me all the time how I like the gigabit fiber service and I compare it to the uselessness of owning a supercar that is capable of going 200mph but never really getting above 50 on the always crowded freeway. These Internet companies are more than happy to sell you premium speeds at premium prices. But whether the rest of the Internet is prepared to let you take advantage of those speeds is another matter.

    1. Well of course. NO company is gong to support a super-fast upstream to client connections… The point of having the download speed is to perform simultaneous high-bandwidth downloads/streams.

      As it is now, my rinky-dinky TWC connection can barely support a single high-def stream from Netflix – during peak hours, the image drops down to standard definition. And this is with a supposedly 15Mbps connection – for $65/month!!!

    2. Yeah, having a huge pipe doesn’t really equate to doing one thing at blinding speeds. Rather, those who will benefit the most are multi-user households, who will be able to do more things at once without impacting the speed. So if you have three kids streaming video, they’ll each get the same performance as one person streaming on a good line today.

      ——RM

    3. Good post, CB! The weakest link in the internet connection chain will drive the responsiveness to the end user. On top of that, web pages have grown far more complicated and packed with data (ad images and video, etc.), leading to huge numbers of server calls and lots of local processing. Sometimes, my “up to 50 Mbps” cable connection does not seem much faster than my dial up connection in the 1990s or my 3 or 6Mbps connection in the 2000s. Each bump in connection speed was countered by more complex web pages and increased consumer competition for the servers and available bandwidth.

      I liken the problem to a city building new roads. First, the bottlenecks in the city still limit traffic flow, even if the main roads are widened and new roads are added. Second, the new roads and road improvements lead to additional development and growth. The traffic actually gets worse as new roads are added and the choke points are stressed even more.

  3. Does this technology solve the distance problem with dsl? I am a couple of miles to far away to get dsl. Sadly, there is virtually nothing available in my area for high speed broadband. I pay for a 5 mbit wireless connection that is closer to 1-2 mbits. Not much good for streaming video…

  4. Handy for those of us in the UK that live on streets that don’t have fibre connectivity. At the moment 20Mbps DSL is as much as I can get without going for a wireless 4G homehub. When virtually everyone else in the city is able to get upwards of 100Mbps (should they want it) I’m beginning to feel left behind.

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