How to cancel your Apple Music subscription

To turn off Apple Music’s automoatic renewal:

In iTunes:
1. Click on your account
2. Select “Account Info”
3. Select Settings>Subscriptions and click “Manage”
4. Set Automatic Renewal to “Off”

In iOS’ Apple Music app:
1. Tap your account
2. Tap “View Apple ID”
3. Select Subscriptions and tap “Manage”
4. Hit the toggle button to turn of automatic renewal

CNET offers a How To video here:
[protected-iframe id=”2a8225d8618d73580759e5e8afd24165-17146794-18685410″ info=”http://www.cnet.com/videos/share/cancel-your-apple-music-subscription/” width=”480″ height=”270″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””]

Direct link to video here.

24 Comments

    1. I’ve seen people asking for this, but I don’t understand the logic behind how this would work. How would you listen to a playlist of music that’s sourced from both Apple Music and your own files (imported from CD or wherever)?

        1. I don’t know why that’s a reply to me. How would iTunes Match allow you to listen to a playlist of both Apple Music and your own sourced files if Apple Music was separate from iTunes?

      1. WRONG AGAIN: They didn’t sign everyone up automatically – yes you are Wrong again! Ha

        You and Fred didn’t even give AM a try did you – and yes your just little trolls aren’t you.

        1. I think you missed Wrong Again’s “/s”. However, to be clear for Fred’s sake. The only people that need to unsubscribe are those that actively subscribed. Apple didn’t automatically subscribe anyone. And, of course, if you “manually” subscribed, you must be the one to “manually” unsubscribe.

          1. Thanks for setting these folks straight, Spark. There is nothing at all controversial about this article.

            If you subscribed to AM, then you can easily unsubscribe, or not, as you choose. You “opted in” when you signed up for AM, and you need to “opt out” if you do not want to continue past the free three month introductory period.

            If you did not subscribe to AM, then you have nothing to worry about. There are no conspiracies, no underhanded moves on the part of Apple, and no surprises.

            Let’s not get crazy on this forum, folks. And please look for the /s modifiers. Also, please watch out for the Freds and Kents and other anonymous posts on this forum under a variety of names. They are not necessarily “value-added.”

  1. Why would I unsubscribe? I love Apple Music! (On iPhone, don’t use it on other devices). And really don’t understand the complaints about the interface. It seems pretty simple to me, and if you do get lost, you can search. My only complaint would be it’s hard to tell what music you have on your device vs. in the cloud (of course, when subscribed and online, you have *everything*, making it a bit moot that it’s also hard to tell what’s “yours” versus “not yours” among cloud tracks). But, the last Music app for iPhone (when used with iTunes Match) had the exact same problem, so nothing new there.

    Bottom line, Apple Music is great for those who are comfortable subscribing to music, and probably quite frustrating for those who cling to pre-streaming habits and collections (I would not be surprised, if most of the complainers on MDN and elsewhere represent the latter). The thing is, for $10 a month, why would you want to own and manage 1000’s of tracks, when you could just search and browse for new music constantly? And if you do go on an airplane or a weekend trip to the woods, it’s easy enough to click “make available offline” on 10 or 20 new (or old) playlists and albums while “packing,” and while it might be hard to figure out a year from then whether they’re still “offline,” you’ll have what you need for your trip.

    I understand I seem to be in the minority here… but I love it. Love the curation, love the selection, love the price, love the look of the app, and yeah the new interface takes a little getting used to, but put in the time and it works just fine.

    1. Sounds like you haven’t had to go through and “make available offline”…. You’d think it would be that easy..but, more often than not, you still have to go through each song and do it again…

      Its a freaking mess.

      We’ve always been able to see all of our music..on the phone or not. The difference now is that you can’t filter for songs that are on your phone and/or hide songs that aren’t.

        1. Were you offline when going back to play them? My work network is spotty at best (proxy), and ATT is dead in our building..so I notice it. First issue I had was with an album I “made available offline” while at home. When I got to work, about half the songs were never playing, and one only played the first few seconds. When I got home again, I noticed that not all of the songs had the phone icon next to them, despite all of them appearing as available the night before. I finally had to go to each song and manually download. PITA. Take a look at the apple support forums..it’s an issue.

          1. How long was it after you selected the “make available offline” option before you left for work? The reason that I am asking is that it takes some time to download a set of songs.

            Assuming that you provided ample time, it sounds like the download process got hung up. Please provide feedback to Apple. This sounds like a highly irritating issue that Apple should be able to easily clear up to the benefit of everyone.

          2. Sorry, I am skimming through MDN posts too quickly. I missed the fact that all of the songs were marked as available the night before. Clearly, Apple has some work to do on its streaming and offline music functions and user interfaces.

            Apple will continue to improve AM over time. Keep providing the feedback to Apple.

            1. No worries. I did it the night before..even checked the store to see if there were active/stalled downloads. FYI, I’m in the Appleseed program for OSX and developer program for iOS. This has been an issue for some time.

    2. It’s a mess that it took me five minutes and stopping the car to find the venerable, useful, Genius to play MY OWN songs, and it takes me long every time I try to use it again. It’s not intuitive, it’s not pretty, it’s heavy, it’s too much information, too many options that nobody cares a lot. I think it even breaks Apple UI policies.

  2. Never signed up.

    There’s something very immature about Apple Music. It may have to be redesigned several times before I consider.

    Given how bad iTunes looks these days, I may never subscribe.

    1. I’m tempted to stop paying for iTunes Match, since it caused me a lot of trouble. I had hoped it would mean “no need to manage music – what you want is available.” Instead it meant “don’t bother trying to manage your music – availability will be a guessing game.” Ugh. I’m sure I could invest a bunch of time to fix it and get all the kinks worked out, but my whole point in paying was to STOP spending time on managing music, not pay to manage something differently.

  3. I love AppleMusic. I don’t understand why MDN (as Apple fans) want to show people how to turn it off. If they managed to subscribe in the first place, it’s patronising to tell people how to turn it off. This is the first BAD POST from MDN.

    1. Nobody needs instructions to subscribe. That part is easy. Apple makes it easy on purpose (so that you can easily find it). Managing your subscription is always going to be much less obvious. It is always going to be hidden under some “My Account” menu. It may not always be intuitive.

  4. How funny, I’ve just turned Auto Subscription back ON!

    I switched it off at the beginning of my trial, thinking I won’t be subscribing.

    Well my free trial expires tomorrow and I’m paying to keep everything I’ve collated over the past 3 months. Sooooooo much new music, combine that with my unlimited data plan and it’s basically all I have ever desired from a music player.

  5. MDN, why are you using Flash for this video? There are many people like me who won’t use Flash as it is ‘a big bag of hurt’. Please stop supporting this failure and use HTML5.

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