Apple’s newest TV ad stresses ‘If it’s not an iPhone, it’s not an iPhone’

Apple has debuted a new TV ad for iPhone on U.S. broadcast and cable networks.

The spot is called “Amazing Apps” and states:

This is an iPhone. And it comes with something amazing: An App Store with over one and a half million of the best apps available. That’s over one and a half million, handpicked, awe-inspiring, just-plain-surprising, who-knew-a-phone-could-do-that apps. If it’s not an iPhone, it’s not an iPhone.

Direct link to video via Apple.com here.

MacDailyNews Take: In other words: Fragmandroid settlers, don’t settle for half-assed knockoffs of the real thing.

SEE ALSO:
Apple debuts ‘If it’s not an iPhone, it’s not an iPhone’ ad campaign – July 10, 2015

27 Comments

    1. Agreed; ad’s have become more trite, pedestrian and generic.
      If it’s not an iPh, it’s not an iPh…”oh I think I’ll be sure to go buy an iPh.” Tell us/show us why it’s diff/better…the imposters will fall be the wayside without having to make mention (see Samsg).

    2. Every now and then Apple comes out with a stinker of a campaign–this is proof of one. Was this created by a bunch of high-school students who won a contest? “If it’s not a great ad, it’s not a great ad.”

    3. Awhile back, I read that Apple was moving their advertising in house. Hope this isn’t their best work. The key is not how many apps, but how the best ones make your life better. The key is not that it’s an iPhone, it’s how an iPhone makes your life better. This ad totally misses it.

    4. Agreed. This ad just screams “in-house”.
      Yes Apple has the best AppStore by far. But, “over one and a half million, handpicked, awe-inspiring, just-plain-surprising, who-knew-a-phone-could-do-that apps” just isn’t true – I’ve certainly downloaded too many duds which shouldn’t be there – bad copies, outdated apps which don’t work properly if at all. I delete them immediately, and the hundreds that I do have are all pretty good… but this new ad worries me because it can damage Apple – a new user who gets a bad app will feel let down. This ad is a lawsuit waiting to happen.

    5. To the doubters out there ré this ad – it’s a fairly common saying, at least here in the UK, which, on deconstruction, translates as…
      “You can steal, copy and clone our IP, design and presentation style ’til the cows come…BUT…it’s still not an iPhone. Never can be and never will be. End of argument.”
      It’s simple, true, assumes the ad recipient is intelligent and manages to put all other phones in their place without mentioning them by name. What’s not to like?

  1. Only Apple can break the law of marketing/publicity and use ‘in your face negation’ and leave a mark in your head. Leave non-iPhone users wondering…

    Those are TV ads. They don’t need to reinvente the precious selfness of using an iPhone in every ad they create.

  2. Eventually Apple should issue a really specific ad that goes to Apple’s core concept for iPhone.

    Unlike Android devices, all iPhones are locked down for customer’s safety in using Apple Pay.

  3. This commercial surprised me. It is definitely not Apple’s usual fare. If I remember correctly it is associated with Verizon so I wonder if Verizon commissioned this.
    Disappointed is my feeling and I hope this is a one off.

  4. The ad is OK although not up to EPIC Apple ad campaign standards of the past.

    At least they are advertising iPhones, they practically stopped advertising Macs years ago in spite of Macs being one of the brightest spots in Apple earnings. Last great Mac campaign Mac/PC guy stopped more than half a decade ago (66 different ads in 4 years).

    no ads (or I’ve noticed) talking about new tech like Force touch, thunderbolt, no ads talking about the eco system, no marketing campaigns to tie in ‘halo effete’ to make use of big iPhone sales ( “bought a new iPhone get a Mac 10% off in the next 30 days ” etc).

    No serious web or social media campaigns. I spend so much time reading tech sites that computer ads for Dell, Acer etc appear on my screen (from my search profile) but I see no APPLE ads from Apple although I mostly read apple stuff !

    I’ve said it often before , for years now, since Jobs got seriously ill Apple Advertising and PR has been lacklustre. Jobs a natural salesman who sold (in tech fairs, pitched investors etc) since he was a kid was a master.

    all the Senior VPs and TC are not natural salespeople except maybe Ahrendts who is stuck in running the retail stores. Even Schiller head of Marketing (great guy that he is) was trained as a scientist.

    as seen by some bizarre incidents in the product launches and PR campaigns (Bono U2 free album into your device , unrehearsed WWDC music launch, Apple watch non launch day launch) etc there are real issues, a lack of sensitive ‘touch’.

    Apple needs serious marketing and PR power at the top.

    1. this people voting me down, can I ask what i said was wrong?

      Are people arguing that today’s campaigns are as good as 1984, Think Different, iPod Dancing Silhouettes, Mac PC guy? That launches and presentations were as smooth and riveting as when Jobs was around?

      apple is larger now with near infinite resources, the marketing campaign should be better not worse.
      Apple still sells huge amounts but I believe it’s due more to word or mouth than advertising. Samsung is a copycat, often sells junk but the fact that it outspends Apple 10 times or more in marketing shows how little Apple does in advertising ( in spite of the urban legend ‘Apple only succeeds in huge marketing spend’ )

      Apple KNOWS that it has problems but is not getting it done yet in fixing it in my opinion.
      Apple has duelled with its advertising agencies, tried to set up it’s own in house , fired the head of USA marking and ‘retired’ the head of PR (both in the same week ).

  5. The ad is fine, except the tag. That tag is terrible. It’s meaningless. I DO understand what the intended message is, but if you took the tag and read it with no other context, it would make no sense. “If it’s not a Samsung, it’s not a Samsung” isn’t any more or less compelling. Their intention is “If it’s not an iPhone, it’s not the best.” But that relies on the viewer believing it to be the best. Also, companies should always punch up, not down and not recognize lessers.

    I would have gone with something like “Only the iPhone”. Or “Only On Your iPhone”. I think they also make a mistake with not including the Apple logo until the last few frames. I think one of the reasons they feel like they have to do this is because people do mistake their Android phones for “iPhone” based on general functionality. They’re worried that it is becoming like “Escalator” and “Xerox”. Which is all the more reason they should be pushing the Apple brand with the more generic sounding “iPhone”.

    1. The ad may be aimed at those that are using iPhone as a generic term for all smart(or not)phones. At one time Coke (the soft drink) had become a generic term for cola, and Xerox became a term for photocopy. Apple may be trying to defend the iPhone trademark. 🖖😀⌚️

      1. In some parts of the world, the say iPod when they mean MP3 player. And this is mostly in places where iPods are too expensive and market is full of cheap no-name brands. All called iPods.

  6. The ad is a little too Samsungy because of the semi-snarky voice-over. Also, the “If it’s not an iPhone..” is bland. They could of said something like, “If it’s not an iPhone then it’s about as much fun as a stick”, and then showed a little bit of this clip:

  7. Folks, the ads are not directed at us. They are directed at the legions of folk out there who presently use inferior phones. It works. By playing on major TV media, the ad will be effective.

    1. Thank you! Somebody with real sense for the purpose and target audience!

      Apple brand is the strongest one out there. So is the iPhone brand. Most importantly, they are aspirational.

      The world knows very well that there is iPhone and there is all other stuff. This ad effectively reminds them of that and pushes towards the purchasing decision.

      Apple’s most iconic ads weren’t about the features; they were about brand. And they were most effective. So is this one.

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