Strengths of Apple Watch emerge over time

“At first, I was overwhelmed by pinging notifications and frustrated by the slow loading speeds of many third-party apps. At least it looked good,” Tim Bradshaw reports for The Financial Times. “But understanding the appeal of the Apple Watch takes time. For instance, after a few days, I worked out the best way to tame notifications: turn them all off and then, one by one, turn them back on if and when you notice something on your iPhone you wish you had seen immediately.”

“Only later did I appreciate one of the Watch’s subtler virtues, notably its Taptic Engine — a gentle, silent vibrating alert when the Watch needs your attention. The alerts vary depending on whether I have received a text message or a tweet, or am directed left or right,” Bradshaw reports. “It helped me decide whether to interrupt a conversation to peek at my wrist and let me find my way to a destination without even looking at a screen.”

“After a handful of Glances and two dozen apps, navigating the Watch became so time-consuming that I might as well have pulled out my phone. Once I did whittle down the combination that suited my routine, the Apple Watch started to make sense. A lubricant to my digital life, it became more valuable the faster I was able to stop peering at my wrist,” Bradshaw reports. “After a month, I don’t want to be without it. But until you wear one for a while, it might be hard to understand why.”

Much more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: With Apple Watch, you have to wear it for awhile to get it.

As we wrote back in March: Just like the tens of millions who said they didn’t want or need an iPhone, who are now on their fifth iPhone, so it’ll go with Apple Watch.

And, as we wrote last month:
Here’s what makers of Swiss or any other watches should do: Push the idea of wearing of two watches, one on each wrist or two on one wrist, into vogue. Because once people start using Apple Watch, they aren’t going to want to leave it at home. Ever. They won’t want to go to dinner parties without their Apple Watch. And that’s bad, bad news for watchmakers not named Apple.

Related articles:
The Telegraph reviews Apple Watch: Object of desire – May 7, 2015
Cult of Mac reviews Apple Watch: ‘Futuristic, fun and fan-flipping-tastic’ – April 28, 2015
PC Magazine reviews Apple Watch: ‘The best smartwatch available’ – April 28, 2015
Apple Watch owners shame so-called professional reviewers – April 27, 2015
The 2:26 Apple Watch review (with video) – April 9, 2015
Tech.pinions’ Ben Bajarin reviews Apple Watch: ‘Powerful’ and ‘completely new’ – April 8, 2015
WSJ’s Stern reviews Apple Watch: ‘Good looks and coolness’ – April 8, 2015
The Verge’s Patel reviews Apple Watch: ‘A masterpiece of engineering’ – April 8, 2015
WSJ’s Fowler reviews Apple Watch: ‘The first smartwatch worth buying’ – April 8, 2015
Yahoo Tech’s Pogue reviews Apple Watch: ‘Magical’
New York Times’ Manjoo reviews Apple Watch: ‘A power you can’t live without’ – April 8, 2015
Bloomberg’s Topolsky reviews Apple Watch: ‘The world’s best smartwatch’ – April 8, 2015
USA Today’s Baig reviews Apple Watch: ‘Second to none; I want one’ – April 8, 2015
Tech.pinions’ Ben Bajarin reviews Apple Watch: ‘Powerful’ and ‘completely new’ – April 8, 2015
WSJ’s Stern reviews Apple Watch: ‘Good looks and coolness’ – April 8, 2015
The Verge’s Patel reviews Apple Watch: ‘A masterpiece of engineering’ – April 8, 2015
WSJ’s Fowler reviews Apple Watch: ‘The first smartwatch worth buying’ – April 8, 2015
Yahoo Tech’s Pogue reviews Apple Watch: ‘Magical’
New York Times’ Manjoo reviews Apple Watch: ‘A power you can’t live without’ – April 8, 2015
Bloomberg’s Topolsky reviews Apple Watch: ‘The world’s best smartwatch’ – April 8, 2015
USA Today’s Baig reviews Apple Watch: ‘Second to none; I want one’ – April 8, 2015

15 Comments

  1. I could definitely see myself wearing something on each wrist, but two on one seems stupid, the crowns/buttons would get in the way of each other and they’d no doubt rub and scratch unless you had them so tight they didn’t move at all.

    1. Not So fast, whenI first got my watch I assumed that I’d wear it during the week @ work, business meetings, personal time etc. Well, it didn’t quite work out that way, On my way out the door to attend a Christian function I had my Omega on my left wrist as normal, and my Apple Watch was on the charger on the night stand. However, when I got in the car, I realized it pained me Not to have my Apple Watch, so I hustled back inside to get my watch, then came what seemed an eternity as I fiddled with both trying to decide how to wear them in tangent, Apple on the right, Omega on the left, no switch them, no switch them again, neither felt right. Then I stumbled upon a solution that worked for me… wear both on my left wrist, but have the Omega turned so the face was on the underside of my wrist, thereby presenting its very nice band as a bracelet, then strap my Apple Watch on above the Omega…. that worked very well for me.

      1. Some people, I’m hearing, like to flip the orientation of the Apple Watch so that the crown and button are on the side opposite the hand. This would mean operation of the Apple watch crown with the thumb, and no crown-collision with the Omega..

  2. The only strengths of the Apple Watch:

    * You can save hundreds to thousands of dollars by NOT buying it

    * You get instant douchebag street credit

    * It qualifies you to compete in Apple’s annual “Gayest Apple Fanbois of the Year Contest”… where the top two finalists get to play grab-ass, and the winner of that match wins the grand prize, dinner with and a teabag by none other than Timothy Cook!

  3. The news of a ‘learning curve’ is correct, though I’d rather say it’s more of an optimization curve. No kidding, this is a super personal device, and it takes a while to mold the interface into one that suits your needs. Once you do that the watch becomes indispensable. And fun. And gorgeous. And delightful. For those who have yet to get a watch BE PATIENT! The rewards are plentiful.

  4. My solution would be a single watchband that holds both my Seiko
    Orange Monster and the Apple watch. I’d wear the Seiko on top
    of my wrist and the Apple on the inside.

    1. Sounds interesting, but I think I read that the Apple Watch biometrics only work if the watch is worn on the top of the wrist.
      Might have to reverse ’em.

  5. Yes indeed. It’s training humans. Up, down, left, right, speed up, slow down. I, the apple watch command your attention. NOW!
    Charge me before you go to bed. Well, I, guess we were semi there with these smart phones anyway.

  6. try this:
    the apple watch charger cable is long enough to tuck in under the watch with it still on your wrist (two notches looser on the band) so you can sleep with it and respond to your alarm more conveniently.
    this is not a joke
    however if you toss and turn that might be a different story. I sleep neat:

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