Tim Cook is ‘betting on Apple,’ don’t bet against him

“The headline from the Wall Street Journal’s wide-ranging interview with Apple CEO Tim Cook was that the company had repurchased $14 billion worth of its own stock in the past two weeks alone,” Mark Rogowsky writes for Forbes. “‘It means that we are betting on Apple. It means that we are really confident on what we are doing and what we plan to do,’ he told the Journal.”

“But forget the financial engineering for a moment; that was easily the least interesting thing Cook had to say,” Rogowsky writes. “Instead, what Cook did talk about that matters to Apple shareholders and supporters was three things (1) the company will launch products in new categories this year (2) despite Apple’s track record, it isn’t opposed to making large acquisitions and (3) the company has a very different take on market share than what a lot of people believe and isn’t ceding ground to anyone.”

Read more in the full article here.

Related articles:
Apple CEO Tim Cook: ‘There will be new categories; we’re working on some really great stuff’ – February 7, 2014
Apple buys back $14 billion shares in two weeks – February 6, 2014

31 Comments

      1. He’s a troll. What he’s saying is, you’re all so shallow, you’re easily distracted to the point of cannibalizing each other.

        All of you praising this astute observation just now learning how ordinary conversations devolve into chaos, after which the perpetrator simply steps away to witness the carnage.

        By any standard, that is a troll, is a bully, is an insecure person who feels brave under a cloak of anonymity.

        Laugh it up Joe, one day everything you compose online will be anchored around your neck, complete with a picture off your driver’s license.

        Good times, oh and lots of fodder for Reality Internet.

        Cheers!

          1. I am G4Dualie EVERYWHERE, have been since 2003.

            Do you change your name when you become irrelevant? No, and neither do I.

            I am consistent if nothing else, I am the same person every place I go and my personality doesn’t change by geolocation or link. I am grateful that all of my work on Huffington Post as g4dualie, has finally been melded with my Facebook account. As other websites take the same precautions to avoid haters & baiters, they will slowly consolidate all of my work in the Tech sector under the unified name of G4Dualie.

            I’ve been quoted by Wall Street from these boards and elsewhere because of overlapping audiences, so I try to maintain some semblance of balance in what I have to say.

            Glad you asked, I am glad to tell.

            I would suggest you all start thinking about your future as a real person on the internet and not just some anonymous character who blends.

            1. “I long for a normal life.”

              Yeah? You and every celebrity who opened Pandora’s box. However, I can appreciate what it’s like to be hunted by those who wish to end you.

              /jarhead speak

    1. We’ve all done it. Doesn’t make you the last, or the best for bringing it up.

      /s

      Redirect…

      Someone is betting Tim Cook is eating his own dog food. Like Jobs, Cook doesn’t drink the Kool-aid, it’s strictly business.

  1. What all this really means is that the day is approaching – albeit way to slowly – when we will have finally reached the end of the Tim Cook era. The question is, what will remain of the once great company when that day does arrive?

    1. In your context, that’s an excellent question and I think I have an answer.

      Every good leader keeps at their desk a binder labelled Desktop Procedures & Turn over Jacket. Inside are the most salient statements of best practices as they relate to the billet or position in context with the organization.

      Tim Cook was handed one by Steve Jobs. In the first few months that binder is indispensable and the last thing a good leader does is update before they turn over the position to the next person.

      It’s how I ran my business. I wrote the DP & TO binder for each of my employees’ positions to be used as a guide in case someone had to cover for another.

      Oh and I also paid my employees 10% more than my competition.

  2. Cook plans to take a total of ~$US 20 billion of stockholder assets to withdraw AAPL shares from the market and to build an aerobie office.

    Meanwhile the Mac Mini hasn’t been updated to Haswell architecture.

    The iPod Classic has gone >4 years without an update.

    There is no Apple standalone display to match iMacs, and no 4K resolution Apple display to go with the Mac Pro.

    The Apple TV continues to age ungracefully.

    Prospective phone customers continue to wait for real iPhone screen size choices.

    Business customers keep wondering what to do when their aging X-Serves go belly up.

    Can someone please explain why pleasing Wall Street is so important to Cook when Apple has so much work to do to please its users?

    1. • Cook plans to take a total of ~$US 20 billion of stockholder assets to withdraw AAPL shares from the market and to build an aerobie office.

      It’s a university, science foundation, proving ground, workplace, and cafeteria among other things.

      • Meanwhile the Mac Mini hasn’t been updated to Haswell architecture.
      • The iPod Classic has gone >4 years without an update.
      • There is no Apple standalone display to match iMacs, and no 4K resolution Apple display to go with the Mac Pro.
      • The Apple TV continues to age ungracefully.
      • Business customers keep wondering what to do when their aging X-Serves go belly up.

      All of which will be rendered moot with a single product, if not two in the next 6-months.

      Prospective phone customers continue to wait for real iPhone screen size choices.

      That one right there makes me gag. When you speak of prospective phone customers, you mean Android users like you who are hoping Apple will offer them an Android knockoff, Woz et. al.

      Android users and PC/M$ users are all alike. Switchers™ all exhibit a defining character trait for Refresh; the excuse to refresh an entire product line because some new obscure feature has been discovered. Even if the feature is half-baked (no software) and offers no real-world use.

      Apple World™ has never operated like that. They release highly-polished long-tail products with legs and by that, the product is functionally complete and “just works”. Its shortcomings and feature-set can only be addressed according to a prearranged time table established by the chief engineer.

      In contrast to that, when iPhone hit in 2007, Samsung dumped the chicklet phone and produced an iPhone knockoff and it was a terrible computer! Just like Windows 3.1 was a terrible Macintosh.

      Your concern appears more like desperation to cast Apple in a bad light. Watch and see if Tim Cook doesn’t smash all of your expectations at WWDC.

      Same ol’ mike or mikey dell or whatever.

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