S.F. district attorney optimistic over Apple, Samsung progress on anti-theft tech for smartphones

“‘Clear improvements’ have been made in future technologies aimed at deterring thieves from stealing smartphones, District Attorney George Gascón said Friday,” Mike Aldax reports for The San Francisco Examiner. “Last week, representatives from Apple and Samsung brought anti-theft technology they are developing to the District Attorney’s Office for review by technical experts.”

“Apple’s Activation Lock and Samsung’s Lojack for Android were tested during a Thursday meeting. Gascón said he could not discuss the technologies that were examined, as the products are not finalized, but he did say Apple told him it’s planning to release anti-theft technology in the fall,” Aldax reports. “‘I’m very optimistic that they came and were willing to share their technology with us,’ Gascón said, adding that Microsoft and Google have yet to come forward with anti-theft solutions.”

Aldax reports, “Last month, Gascón and New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman launched the Secure Our Smartphones initiative, which called for the development of kill switches that would remotely disable smartphones in the event of theft. The technology presented Thursday shows that the question is no longer whether the technology exists but when it will be available to the public, according to Gascón’s office.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Did anyone bother to tell Gascón or the S.F. Examiner reporter that, while Apple’s Activation Lock solution will be a free feature of iOS 7, to which virtually all iOS users will upgrade, Samsung’s “Lojack for Android” will cost US$29.99 per year, therefore the vast majority of the notoriously cheap Samsung Android settlers will not activate it, thereby solving nothing?

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11 Comments

  1. “Did anyone bother to tell Gascón or the S.F. Examiner reporter that, while Apple’s Activation Lock solution will be a free feature of iOS 7, to which virtually all iOS users will upgrade, Samsung’s “Lojack for Android” will cost US$29.99 per year, therefore the vast majority of the notoriously cheap Samsung Android settlers will not activate it, thereby solving nothing?”

    I’m guessing, no.

  2. “Did anyone bother to tell Gascón or the S.F. Examiner reporter that, while Apple’s Activation Lock solution will be a free feature of iOS 7, to which virtually all iOS users will upgrade, Samsung’s “Lojack for Android” will cost US$29.99 per year, therefore the vast majority of the notoriously cheap Samsung Android settlers will not activate it, thereby solving nothing?”

    Actually, I disagree that it will solve nothing. It has two major benefits:

    First, it gives the Android sufferers another chance at buying a real smartphone.

    Second, it inflicts the pain of Android on the thief.

    Where’s the problem?

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