Apple offers Proview $16 million settlement for iPad trademark in China, says source

“Apple wants to pay Proview to put an end to their iPad trademark fight. But the price tag remains a sticking point,” Lance Whitney reports for CNET.

“Apple has offered to pay Proview $16 million for the rights to the iPad name in China. But Proview is reportedly looking for a lot more, according to a report from Chinese site Sina.com picked up from the Beijing Times. Citing a ‘source close to the negotiations,’ the Times said that Apple’s offer was rejected by Proview earlier this week,” Whitney reports. “Struggling to stay afloat after going bankrupt, Proview is in quick need of cash, and lots of it… In total, Proview owes around $400 million to its creditors, though there seems to be confusion over whether that number is 400 million in U.S. dollars or 400 million in Chinese yuan ($64 million).”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Apple already paid Proview for the right to use “iPad” in China. We wouldn’t give the desperate extortionists 16-cents.

WWSD? Likely he’d tell ’em to go pound sand.

Related articles:
California Judge throws out Proview lawsuit against Apple over iPad trademark – May 8, 2012
Apple pushing for settlement in iPad trademark dispute, says Proview lawyer – May 7, 2012
Chinese court seeks to mediate iPad trademark dispute; settlement ‘likely’ says Proview lawyer – April 24, 2012
Apple in court-recommended talks with Chinese iPad trademark challenger Proview – April 20, 2012
Apple pressures Beijing with iPad snub – April 17, 2012
Apple CEO Tim Cook meets with Vice Premier of China; Proview says ‘political public relations campaign’ – March 28, 2012
Apple: Proview is lying about iPad trademark in China to stave off creditors – March 22, 2012
Major creditor seeks liquidation of Chinese iPad trademark challenger Proview – March 5, 2012
Proview lawyer hopes Apple makes contact for iPad trademark settlement – March 1, 2012
China higher court hears Apple’s iPad trademark appeal – February 29, 2012
Apple iPad trademark case in Shanghai suspended; Proview injunction rejected – February 24, 2012
Proview sues Apple in the US, mass hilarity ensues – February 24, 2012
Proview files lawsuit in California against Apple over iPad trademark – February 24, 2012
Chinese court says Apple can continue selling iPads in Shanghai – February 23, 2012

35 Comments

    1. Because dragging this out is costing Apple money. At some point, it is easier and cheaper to pay them off.

      I’m not claiming that any of the figures reflect the number that would be right for Apple. I’m sure Apple has done the math on this and understands what value makes the most sense for them at any given date.

      True, it could be that Apple will never pay them off just to discourage future claims that are similar.

      1. Yes, that’s why companies settle. BUT, Apple could have settled a long time ago for what they are offering now. I figured they were fighting the case based upon principle, and also to send a message that trademark squatters don’t profit. Trademark squatting is a huge business in China, and settling with Proview will only encourage the Chinese to continue. Virtually every combination of i-Anything has been registered in China with the hopes that they can profit from Apple.

    2. Okay, I read the original Chinese article at Sina.com. It states Apple offered 100M RMB, which is roughly $16M USD. And, it states the Proview debt is $400M USD. The only confusion is Cnet’s writer, but the original Chinese article does not express any confusion.

    1. Right, because a Steve-led Apple would *never* try to settle.

      Oh wait. How did the Nokia situation turn out? Settlement. June 2011. Who was running Apple at the time? Steve.

      Oops.

      MDN needs to stop playing the “WWSD” card. Nobody knows for sure what Steve would have done. He’s dead. Let him rest in peace.

  1. All TC has to do is wait out Proview. Proview is DESPERATE for cash, and doesn’t have the luxury of time in a prolonged fight. If indeed Apple offered some around $16 Million, that is all Proview is going to see, if that.

  2. The $16 million is possibly less than it would cost Apple to fight this in court. Not just the legal fees, but time and hassle and other expenses. Also, I wonder if it helps Apple’s case with the court if it can show a good faith offer? If Proview turns it down, then it just shows the company’s just a money seeker and this has nothing to do with a trademark issue.

  3. Apple should stick a fork, no wait, make that a chopstick, in Proview because it’s done. Proview is like that Colombian prostitute who says she’s worth $800 a bang but in reality would be happy to pocket $200.

    Well, Apple is offering $200 in this case, which sounds about right, unlike that tightwad Secret Service agent who tried to get away with $50 and found himself turfed out of a job.

    Anyway it all goes down a hole so the result is the same, although the extortion method may differ.

  4. Even if Apple won and got all costs (assuming they could recover them) there’s still the time and resources that could possibly be better devoted elsewhere.

    1. wow. that’s deep.

      Even if Apple wins this time, they’ll have to go through it all again, once the shakeup at the upper-echelon’s of the Communist Party have run their course. There will be new people in power, with new POVs and demands and, as some believe, invoke a moratorium on internet devices altogether, until they can squelch the “sneaker net” that is exposing the government corruption in the Bo Xilai defection case.

    1. Thats why Apple is offering a $16 million settlement. The delay in selling iPads in China is killing Apple. Add in the legal costs, and $16 million probably saves Apple a LOT of money.

    2. That’s right. There is no other business until Apple has removed (paid off) every obstruction to Apple’s iDevices.

      Apple could survive for the rest of the millennium just on sales to China alone.

      1. For what it’s worth, you might be responsible for saving my life. You were the only one who noticed my decline and were the only one who … kinda reached out.

        For that I owe you a debt of gratitude. This Marine has got your back, silverhawk1. Thanks.

Add Your Feedback

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.