Liquidmetal Technologies filing outlines its multimillion dollar agreement with Apple

“Toward the end of 2010, Apple entered into an exclusive agreement to license the use of Liquidmetal’s amorphous metal alloys with unique atomic structures, used to create products that are stronger, lighter, and resistant to wear and corrosion,” Daniel Eran Dilger reports for AppleInsider.

“Toward the end of 2010, Apple entered into an exclusive agreement to license the use of Liquidmetal’s amorphous metal alloys with unique atomic structures, used to create products that are stronger, lighter, and resistant to wear and corrosion,” Dilger reports. “Describing that transaction, Liquidmetal stated, ‘On August 5, 2010, we entered into a license transaction with Apple Inc. (“Apple”) pursuant to which (i) we contributed substantially all of our intellectual property assets to a newly organized special-purpose, wholly-owned subsidiary, called Crucible Intellectual Property, LLC (‘CIP’), (ii) CIP granted to Apple a perpetual, worldwide, fully-paid, exclusive license to commercialize such intellectual property in the field of consumer electronic products, as defined in the license agreement, in exchange for a license fee, and (iii) CIP granted back to us a perpetual, worldwide, fully-paid, exclusive license to commercialize such intellectual property in all other fields of use.'”

Dilger reports, “AppleInsider was first to discover that Apple was looking to hire a number of experts on amorphous metal alloys to build products using Liquidmetal’s technology.”

Read more in the full article here.

Related articles:
Apple granted its first Liquidmetal patent – January 5, 2011
Apple patent application describes scratch-resistant stainless steel – October 29, 2010
Join the dots on six future Apple technologies – September 22, 2010
Apple already using Liquidmetal in their… – August 17, 2010
Inventor says Liquidmetal may be used for new iPhone antenna – August 13, 2010
Apple already uses Liquidmetal; Guess which product and win a Magic Trackpad – August 13, 2010
How will Apple use their exclusive Liquidmetal alloy? – August 12, 2010
Apple’s exclusive Liquidmetal pact could see future Apple products encased in metallic glass – August 11, 2010
Apple inks deal for exclusive rights to custom, super-durable metal alloy – August 09, 2010

11 Comments

  1. I love the feel and finish of Apple’s “iMetal” and believe it is highly recyclable and used many other Apple products – deserving a place rightfully to Apple.

    BUT — if you ever accidentally dropping your iPad on the road – hitting just one of its corners. The metal is very soft. It dents and damages easily. If it were made of highly resistant plastic; I doubt there would be a mark.

    I have dropped my Panasonic camera many times in the same manner – it works perfectly today as does my iPad still does;
    but these marks are permanent. It is not resistant to scratches dents or bumps and generally it is heavier then plastic too.

    1. oooops, sorry, I obviously got this very confused with the aluminum metal Apple lathes for iPad and MacBook Pro.

      Liquid Metal to also known as quicksilver or mercury.

      1. ummm…no. While the element mercury (Hg) is liquid at room temperature, it is not to be confused with the metal alloy that this outfit refers to as Liquidmetal™, a trade name for the combination of elements that they’ve developed.

        Mercury is one of those elements that we’re trying to eliminate from the production of consumer devices and fish food.

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