Debt-laden Proview: China’s customs authorities unlikely to intervene in any ban of iPad exports

“A debt-laden Chinese technology firm seeking to ban all shipments of Apple’s popular iPad tablet into and out of the country has been told that China’s customs authorities are unlikely to intervene in the trademark battle,” Lee Chyen Yee and Clare Jim report for Reuters.

“‘The customs have told us that it will be difficult to implement a ban because many Chinese consumers love Apple products. The sheer size of the market is very big,’ Yang Long-san, chief of Proview Technology (Shenzhen), told Reuters in a telephone interview on Wednesday,'” Lee and Jim report. “Yang said the best option to resolve the legal dispute would be an out-of-court settlement. The next hearing of the case is due for February 22 in Shanghai.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Obviously, China is not going to kill the golden goose in behalf of a debt-laden trademark troll that’s begging for a settlement. It’s not Apple’s responsibility to prop up your shiteous failure of a company.

Related articles:
Apple may face iPad export ban in China trademark dispute – February 14, 2012
Proview to seek $1.5 billion from Apple in Chinese iPad trademark lawsuit – February 7, 2012
Apple appeals rejection of iPad trademark in China – January 31, 2012
Apple not allowed to call an iPad an iPad in China, court rules – December 7, 2011
Chinese court rejects Apple lawsuit over iPad trademark – December 6, 2011
iPad trademark: Proview Technology hopes to use Apple as ‘get out of debt free’ card – October 28, 2010
Chinese company claims Apple violating iPad trademark – October 27, 2010
Apple secures iPad trademark from Fujitsu – March 28, 2010

8 Comments

  1. China is poised to be the next golden goose for Apple. In my work, I come across many Chinese people, and almost all who can afford it have an iPhone 4S.

    They don’t dick around with Android or other Apple-wannabe devices. They know the real thing, and don’t get tied up in all sorts of mental gymnastics wondering what they should buy.

    1. Awesome. Android is in for a world of hurt this year with very serious lawsuits by Apple and Oracle. I expect with the addition of major fragmentation and the expansion of the 4s and iCloud and iPad 3 we are starting to see the beginning of the end of Android as a serious player in the post PC world.

  2. A lawsuit, which could end in an out-of-court settlement, is the obvious solution for a dispute involving a trademark or product name.

    Apple has not stolen the company’s technology, and it isn’t doing irreparable harm to its business prospects … which, from press reports, seem minimal. Court-ordered injunctions are not the solution to very many commercial disputes. Both Apple and Proview both know that, so neither takes the ‘ban’ seriously.

  3. what i love about this – you check out their site (proview.com) and all their photos are stock photos of western people. for a chinese company in a chinese market when the site is in chinese, yet all the images are western, that says a lot – poor business sense and lack of strategy.

    no wonder they are tanking.

  4. The ridiculous results of Proview’s criminal behavior become ever more entangled in the stooopid:

    “[Proview] has been told that China’s customs authorities are unlikely to intervene in the trademark battle.”

    The specific reason why is that Proview already lost to Apple in the sales contract designated court jurisdiction of Hong Kong. None of the other Proview court cases in China have any validity or legality.

    “‘The customs have told us that it will be difficult to implement a ban because many Chinese consumers love Apple products…”

    …BlahBlahBlah. Irrelevant. It’s over. Proview lost. Any proper and legitimate government would make that clear, as well as their customs authority. But we’re dealing with China: Criminal Nation as well as Proview: Criminal Company. Watch in amusement. 😆

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