Piper Jaffray: Apple building prototype televisions for potential 2012 launch

“Analyst Gene Munster with Piper Jaffray revealed in a note to investors on Monday that a source close to an Asian component supplier claimed in September that Apple was building prototype models of its rumored high-definition television set,” Neil Hughes reports for AppleInsider.

“If Apple were to launch a TV set in late 2012, he believes it would add about 3 percent to the company’s revenue in 2013,” Hughes reports. “With a projected 220 million flat panel TVs to be sold in 2012, 48 percent, or 106 million, will be Internet-connected devices, and he sees Apple selling 1.4 million of those.”

Hughes reports, “With the addition of iCloud and Siri voice control, Munster believes Apple is even more prepared to launch an HDTV in the coming years. With iCloud, users could access TV shows, pictures, and potentially moves, while Siri could ‘simplify the chore of inputting information like show titles, or actor names, into a TV.'”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: If Apple launches an Apple-branded HDTV, they will sell more than 1.4 million units in the first weekend alone.

Related articles:
Analyst says Apple ‘iTV’ integrated television set coming in 2012 – October 24, 2011
Steve Jobs’ told biographer: ‘I finally cracked’ the secret to an easy-to-use integrated HDTV – October 21, 2011
Apple reportedly gearing up to produce Apple HDTV set for Christmas 2012 – October 20, 2011
Apple is working on a television for 2012, say sources – August 28, 2011

27 Comments

  1. Shamdung must be crapping in their pants in anticipation of having the TV market pulled out from under them by Apple. I’m sure they’ll TRY to come up with some lame craptastic copy. So solly Chahlie.

    Buying Siri was one of Apple’s best decisions and a super-steal at $200 million which you consider it’s broad implications in consumer tech.

  2. It depends on how much it will cost. The original iPhone sold well for $600.00, but not until it was subsidized that it started flying off the shelves. They also cut $200.00 off it’s intial price (399.00) after the first month. Apple tends to start too high on the initial release of a new product….. AppleTV was another high priced release. They could sell a ton of the new product if priced right.

    1. I’m hoping it isn’t priced like the ridiculously overpriced Bose Videowave TV. Over $5k for a 46″ LCD TV?

      ATV2 is already simply enough, so I don’t need my TV made any more “simple”. ( and I have a harmony 1100 remote for all the input switching, etc.)

      I’ll likely stick to my plasma/ATV2 combo unless this thing really delivers something incredible for the money. I’d probably top out at about $3k for something amazing. Much more than that, and I think it quickly becomes a very niche product, especially with the prices on panels these days and the average consumer not caring about any specs other than seeing “1080p” (which is why the 120hz LCD panels still sell well).

    2. True for the original Apple TV and the iPhone, but more recently the latest Apple TV and the MacBook Air are priced aggressively, the iPad was low priced low (compared to pre-launch expectations) from the get go.

      1. Two good examples (iPad/MacBook Air) on a better price for new releases. I totally agree with you on Apple’s aggressive pricing for those 2 products. Let’s hope that if a “TV” is in the works, they follow that pattern opposed to the other “non-aggressive” pricing. I’ll be one of the first in line if priced right.

  3. Munster was saying it for years and every time he had to push his prognosis for another year further since Apple was not releasing iTV.

    Since iTV is not about a mere UI, it is much more complicated than that, this project is not guaranteed to necessary implemented in a product soon. Maybe not next year or even after next year.

    Why it is complicated? Hear it yourself near the end of last year’s Jobs’ interview to Mossberg:

    http://allthingsd.com/20100607/steve-jobs-at-d8-the-full-uncut-interview/

  4. I’ll stick with my 4yo 40″ Sony Bravia, with my 1.1Tb Mac Mini 4Gb of memory, Lion and BT Keyboard and Trackpad thank you. The only thing I wish I could find a way of doing is programming a short cut to switch between the external sources so that I can access the Mac quickly the switch back quickly to my satellite box.

    1. The paraphrased lyrics are from “Money for Nothing” – originally by Dire Straits, though Sting may have covered it.

      I for one don’t see Apple releasing their own branded television. It’s a notoriously low-margin business, even for those assembling in China (which Apple already does). Besides, there are a myriad of choices Apple would have to make: technology (plasma, LED, AmoLED, etc.), screen size, etc. I just don’t see it.

  5. I can finally see, with Siri, iCloud, etc., and internet connectivity and easy networking with your Mac, what Apple can bring to the TV market and how they will differentiate themselves. Also, it will likely integrate music via iTunes in a wonderful way.

  6. I think that a couple of things would need to happen for Apple to release a TV. The most important will be how it is distributed and how it is supported. The ability for a consumer to walk into an Apple Store and walk out with a product is very attractive. Of course with new products it may not happen right away but as the dust settles, people want to walk out with a product. In order for consumers to leave with a television, Apple will need to have the ability for loading the product in a loading dock in the rear of their stores. Walking out the front door with a 60″ television and across the parking lot is not feasible in most situations. Of course Apple could go with a straight home delivery shipping option but I would think they may want to have in-store pickup as an option.

    Everyone knows that electronics have problems. It is not easy to take a TV that is no longer in its box back to the store for repairs. Will Apple trust another company to handle repairs? Will they have certified Apple repair centers? Will Apple have their own technicians go to the consumers’ homes?

    While Apple may very well be working on prototypes, much more will need to be thought out before they are released.

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