Apple’s new 27-inch iMacs support dual-monitor out via dual Thunderbolt ports

“Apple’s new big-screen 27-inch iMac, released on Tuesday, comes with two Thunderbolt ports for both high-speed input/output and Mini DisplayPort support for additional monitors,” Sam Oliver reports for AppleInsider.

“The inclusion of two Thunderbolt ports means the iMac can support three displays, when combined with the 27-inch screen on the all-in-one machine,” Oliver reports. “Engadget put the new feature to the test, hooking two 30-inch Dell displays up to the two Thunderbolt ports on the 27-inch iMac.”

MacDailyNews Take: Yuck. Yugo headlights on an Audi.

Oliver reports, “The end result was a total of 11,878,400 pixels spanning three displays.”

Full article, with a video of the new iMac powering 3 displays, here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Dan K.” for the heads up.]

15 Comments

  1. No matte antiglare screens on the new iMacs. If you need matte screens, there’s something you can do – add your voice to 1,300+ petitions at http://macmatte.wordpress.com Unlike personal emails to Apple – which Apple just ignore, asserting everyone loves glossy screens – make it count by adding to the online petition where your voice will remain visible on the net until Apple listens. Remember, adding your comment to transient news articles on the net is fine, but those articles go out of date in a few weeks, and also there is no long-term accumulation and consolidation of numbers, like there is at a petition site.

  2. No matte antiglare screens on the new iMacs. If you need matte screens, there’s something you can do – add your voice to 1,300+ petitions at http://macmatte.wordpress.com Unlike personal emails to Apple – which Apple just ignore, asserting everyone loves glossy screens – make it count by adding to the online petition where your voice will remain visible on the net until Apple listens. Remember, adding your comment to transient news articles on the net is fine, but those articles go out of date in a few weeks, and also there is no long-term accumulation and consolidation of numbers, like there is at a petition site.

    1. Good luck with that.

      In general, online petitions carry as much weight as the paper they were signed on. If we take a candid testimony from one of the US congressmen, the level of engagement from those who are sought for engagement are in direct proportion with the amount of effort expended on such engagement. The most active response and action is received when one visit congressman’s office in person. After that, it is when one writes a personal letter (in hand). Following that is when one mails a form letter, but signs it personally and mails it individually. The bottom of the list is personal e-mail. A hard-copy petition, with an actual signature is near that bottom. An e-mail petition is definitely NOT on anyone’s list (according to this one congressman), because it takes absolutely NO effort to sign. I can’t remember the name of this congressman, but what he said makes sense to me.

      As I said, good luck with your petition.

  3. Couldn’t you hook up 2 displays using only one Thunderbolt port? I thought that part of the big draw to Thunderbolt is that it can be daisy-chained almost infinitely.

    1. You could, but the display you were plugging it into would need a Thunderbolt port as well. So then you could run another Thunderbolt cable from that display to another. And seeing how no displays have that it doesn’t work.
      And Thunderbolt can be daisy-chained 6 times.

    1. Yes and no. I bought a Dell 21″ monitor for my wife’s Mac mini. For the price, the overall clarity of the display is fine, but the bezel indent is highly reflective and, to my eye, creates an annoying line of light just above the top of the screen.

      Fortunately, my wife doesn’t notice it, but it’s something that you wouldn’t encounter on an Apple monitor. You get what you pay for.

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