Analysts: Google, RIM are now no match for unbeatable Apple

Apple Online StoreThe Economic Times reports, “Agreeing with Apple boss Steve Jobs’ claim Monday that ‘we’ve now passed RIM (Research in Motion) and I don’t see them catching up with us in the foreseeable future,’ technology and financial analysts here say the BlackBerry maker RIM and Google are now no match for Apple.”

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“As Jobs, CEO of the world’s largest technology company, unveiled Apple’s new Mac OS X Lion operating system as well as two new versions ultralight MacBook Air laptops in Cupertino Wednesday, analysts said Apple is simply unbeatable now,” The Economic Times reports. “‘We agree with his (Jobs’) views,’ analyst Michael Walkley of Canacord Genuity here told the National Post daily, raising his price target on Apple stock to whopping $421 per share.”

The Economic Times reports, “Analysts also agreed with Steve Jobs’ criticism of Google’s Android operating system which uses multiple hardware manufacturers and multiple version of software. Jobs had said Monday that Google’s ‘fragmented’ operating system will harm the user experience. ‘This fragmentation also leads to frustration for application developers that have to create numerous iterations of their program so that is can be optimized for each particular Android device,’ the Post quoted Maynard Um, analyst with UBS Investment Research, as saying.”

Full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: No company is “unbeatable,” but Apple, if they continue executing as well as they have been for quite some time now, comes awfully damn close.

By the way, in response to the analysts’ assertions, it’s rumored that The Wall Street Journal’s Walter S. Mossberg had this to say: “I’m *Android* afraid *Android* I’ll *Android* come *Android* across *Android* as *Android* an *Android* Apple *Android* fanboy *Android*, so *Android* Android *Android*.”

Android Tourette’s is a terrible affliction.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Judge Bork” for the heads up.]

42 Comments

  1. Well. SOMEBODY has to be the top dog. May as well the best, most creative, innovative company. In the meantime. everyone else can just get their sh*t together, or hey…

    If you can’t beat ’em just join ’em.

  2. Well. SOMEBODY has to be the top dog. May as well the best, most creative, innovative company. In the meantime. everyone else can just get their sh*t together, or hey…

    If you can’t beat ’em just join ’em.

  3. I agree. That realization was reinforced as I watched yesterday’s media event. I saw those MacBook Airs and I thought, “These guys just don’t quit; who else works like they do?” Apple can’t stop innovating. They have the most impressive work ethic of any consumer electronics company in history. They’re more akin to luxury car makers, who keep pushing the automotive envelope when you swore it was about to split open. Compare Apple to Mercedes, Aston Martin and BMW; they have no equals in the CE category.

  4. I agree. That realization was reinforced as I watched yesterday’s media event. I saw those MacBook Airs and I thought, “These guys just don’t quit; who else works like they do?” Apple can’t stop innovating. They have the most impressive work ethic of any consumer electronics company in history. They’re more akin to luxury car makers, who keep pushing the automotive envelope when you swore it was about to split open. Compare Apple to Mercedes, Aston Martin and BMW; they have no equals in the CE category.

  5. In a world of corporate performance measured in cost cutting and “efficiency”, where accountants scrutinize every decision made and executives try to copy what everyone else is doing in order to avoid criticism (“best practices”), Apple sticks out like a pink tutu in a North Korean military parade. It’s testimony that at least one American corporation is not run by soulless bureaucrats whose main objective is to go unnoticed. Thank you, Steve.

  6. In a world of corporate performance measured in cost cutting and “efficiency”, where accountants scrutinize every decision made and executives try to copy what everyone else is doing in order to avoid criticism (“best practices”), Apple sticks out like a pink tutu in a North Korean military parade. It’s testimony that at least one American corporation is not run by soulless bureaucrats whose main objective is to go unnoticed. Thank you, Steve.

  7. @R2

    That’s because the creative people run Apple, and I include their engineers in that because clearly they have a philosophy of creativity at all levels, not just in design but also in marketing, engineering and production. When you get the bean counters and sales people running the company you see what happens.

    I had the privilege to hear Steve Jobs speak to a group of about 20 students of which I was one in 1989 during his ‘exile’ at Next. To be honest, at the time I didn’t know much about Steve or even Apple history, all I remember was how impressed I was with the manner in which he spoke of his craft. About how attention to detail at every level contributes to the success of a company. I remember the passion in his voice when speaking of the ways to best run a company and produce great products.

    So now, 20 years later, it comes as no surprise to me that Apple has achieved the success it has. My greatest hope for Apple is that the values and philosophies he has championed over the years continue to thrive there well after he has stepped down from his role as their leader.

  8. @R2

    That’s because the creative people run Apple, and I include their engineers in that because clearly they have a philosophy of creativity at all levels, not just in design but also in marketing, engineering and production. When you get the bean counters and sales people running the company you see what happens.

    I had the privilege to hear Steve Jobs speak to a group of about 20 students of which I was one in 1989 during his ‘exile’ at Next. To be honest, at the time I didn’t know much about Steve or even Apple history, all I remember was how impressed I was with the manner in which he spoke of his craft. About how attention to detail at every level contributes to the success of a company. I remember the passion in his voice when speaking of the ways to best run a company and produce great products.

    So now, 20 years later, it comes as no surprise to me that Apple has achieved the success it has. My greatest hope for Apple is that the values and philosophies he has championed over the years continue to thrive there well after he has stepped down from his role as their leader.

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