Daylight Saving Time switch reveals iOS recurring alarm bug

“As NSW, Victoria, Tasmania, the ACT and South Australia switched to daylight saving time at the weekend, a bug in the Apple iPhone caused some workers to run late yesterday,” Ben Grubb reports for The Syndey Morning Herald. “The bug appears to affect only those with a ‘recurring’ alarm.”

Grubb reports, “There has been no indication when a fix might be made available. Apple Australia has been contacted for comment but is yet to respond… The bug appears to affect all of Apple’s products running iOS – Apple’s operating system for its iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. Last week Apple blog TUAW noted the same issue for New Zealand iOS users.”

Grubb reports, “Whirlpool user Mr.Likeable suggested that recurring alarms set prior to daylight saving time would make your iPhone alarm go off one hour later than you wanted it to and that an alarm set since the time change would make it go off one hour earlier.”

Full article here.

MacDailyNews Note: Watch those alarms (set ’em manually) until Apple pushes out a fix.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Luke C.” for the heads up.]

58 Comments

  1. @ AZ_Girl,

    The golf course owners got together and lobbied the various governments to bring in Daylight Savings Time.

    It was a scheme to get golfers who work for a living to play 9 or even 18 holes after work during the week and not just play it on the weekends. It kick started the golfing industry that we know today.

    Give key politicians free golf club memberships and you can get anything done.

  2. @ AZ_Girl,

    The golf course owners got together and lobbied the various governments to bring in Daylight Savings Time.

    It was a scheme to get golfers who work for a living to play 9 or even 18 holes after work during the week and not just play it on the weekends. It kick started the golfing industry that we know today.

    Give key politicians free golf club memberships and you can get anything done.

  3. @AZ_Girl

    Daylight saving time (DST) – also summer time in British English – is the practice of temporarily advancing clocks so that afternoons have more daylight and mornings have less. Typically clocks are adjusted forward one hour near the start of spring and are adjusted backward in autumn. Modern DST was first proposed in 1895 by George Vernon Hudson. Many countries have used it since then; details vary by location and change occasionally.

    The practice is controversial. Adding daylight to afternoons benefits retailing, sports, and other activities that exploit sunlight after working hours, but causes problems for farming, evening entertainment and other occupations tied to the sun. Traffic fatalities are reduced when there is extra afternoon daylight. Its effect on health and crime is less clear. Although an early goal of DST was to reduce evening usage of incandescent lighting, formerly a primary use of electricity, modern heating and cooling usage patterns differ greatly, and research about how DST currently affects energy use is limited or contradictory.

  4. @AZ_Girl

    Daylight saving time (DST) – also summer time in British English – is the practice of temporarily advancing clocks so that afternoons have more daylight and mornings have less. Typically clocks are adjusted forward one hour near the start of spring and are adjusted backward in autumn. Modern DST was first proposed in 1895 by George Vernon Hudson. Many countries have used it since then; details vary by location and change occasionally.

    The practice is controversial. Adding daylight to afternoons benefits retailing, sports, and other activities that exploit sunlight after working hours, but causes problems for farming, evening entertainment and other occupations tied to the sun. Traffic fatalities are reduced when there is extra afternoon daylight. Its effect on health and crime is less clear. Although an early goal of DST was to reduce evening usage of incandescent lighting, formerly a primary use of electricity, modern heating and cooling usage patterns differ greatly, and research about how DST currently affects energy use is limited or contradictory.

Reader Feedback

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.