Fujitsu claims ‘iPad’ trademark; consulting with lawyers

“Fujitsu, which applied for an iPad trademark in 2003, is claiming first dibs, setting up a fight with Apple over the name of the new tablet device that Apple plans to sell starting in March,” Hiroko Tabuchi reports for The new York Times. “‘It’s our understanding that the name is ours,’ Masahiro Yamane, director of Fujitsu’s public relations division, said Thursday. He said Fujitsu was aware of Apple’s plans to sell the iPad tablet and that the company was consulting lawyers over next steps.”

“Fujitsu’s iPad, which runs on Microsoft’s CE.NET operating system, has a 3.5-inch color touchscreen, an Intel processor and Wi-fi and Bluetooth connections; it also supports VoIP telephone calls over the Internet, a technology also used by Skype,” Tabuchi reports. “The iPads from Fujitsu can sell for more than US$2,000.”

MacDailyNews Take: We purposely didn’t embed the photo of the thing in this article, because it looks exactly as you’d imagine the spawn of Fujitsu and Microsoft would look. Picture it in your mind and then click to see for yourself. Eerie, huh?

Tabuchi continues, “Fujitsu’s application to trademark the iPad name stalled because of an earlier filing by Mag-Tech, an information technology security company based Seal Beach, California, for a handheld number-encrypting device. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office listed Fujitsu’s application as abandoned in early 2009, but the company revived its application in June.”

“The following month, Apple used a proxy to apply for an international trademark for the iPad. It has since filed a string of requests with the U.S. Patent Office for more time to oppose Fujitsu’s application,” Tabuchi reports. “Apple has until Feb. 28 to say whether it will oppose Fujitsu’s claims to the iPad name.”

Tabuchi reports, “While the dispute between Fujitsu and Apple centers on the United States, there are other iPads around the world. The German conglomerate Siemens uses the name for engines and motors, while a Canadian lingerie company, Coconut Grove Pads, has the right to market iPad padded bras.”

Full article here.

Earlier this month, MacNN reported, “Apple is actively working to take the American ‘iPad’ trademark away from Fujitsu, unearthed documents show. It was recently discovered that Apple is filing for the iPad name in Canada, Europe and Hong Kong, but that because of Fujitsu, the company cannot do so in the US. The Fujitsu iPAD is already a tangible product, a handheld device used by retail workers.”

Although Fujitsu first filed for the iPad name in March 2003, the trademark has still not been assigned,” MacNN reported. “Apple now has until February 28th to make its submissions. The delays may be strategic, as the company could be in a better legal position if it announces or launches an iPad product before filing an appeal.”

Full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: “I don’t love the name. I would have gone with ‘iTouch’ if only to teach a lesson to everyone who’s ever incorrectly referred to an iPod touch by that name. It would have been fun to say, ‘Go back and revise those 3.27 million articles where you wrongly used ‘iTouch,’ m’kay?’ Oh, well, a missed opportunity. Instead, we lucky iPad owners will get to endure feminine napkin comments from jealous anti-Apple ignoramuses and sixth grade boys.” – SteveJack, MacDailyNews, January 27, 2010

52 Comments

  1. MDN you made me click that link and it was funny. It was actually worse than what I could imagine to be the klutziest. Now there’s a talent.

    Meanwhile, Apple, please avail yourself this opportunity and re-brand that thing. Call it anything else you like, but please retire this childish ‘i.’ It had its moments, now a new decade to move on with.

  2. I sometimes work with Fujitsu products for point of sale applications. The ipad from Fujitsu in this pic looks just like a POS handheld they sell and they are constantly breaking down and retail staff who use them, complain about them being buggy. Fujitsu will fight this since it means $$$$

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