RUMOR: Apple won’t use Intel’s default 32nm Arrandale, refuses to adopt Intel integrated graphics

Black Friday/Cyber Monday Apple Blowout“Apple is the company that is known for always going on their own way and now it seems that the divide between Apple and Intel is wider than ever,” Theo Valich reports for Bright Side Of New.

“According to sources close to the heart of the matter, Apple allegedly refused to adopt Intel’s Arrandale and the Calpella platform in its default form. In order for Apple to implement Calpella design with their next refresh of Mac mini / MacBook / MacBook Pro lines, Intel will have to provide Apple with the 32nm version without the integrated graphics part,” Valich report.

Valich report, “Again, we cannot confirm the information about the replacement CPU, we only know that Apple rejected Arrandale.”

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Fred Mertz” for the heads up.]

54 Comments

  1. I’m all for dumping Intel’s crappy integrated graphics, but what choice does Apple have? If Intel says no to dropping the integrated graphics, that means Apple doesn’t get to use the latest processors. Then what? Intel is the only game in town. AMD is a non-factor.

  2. Develop your own processors. Vertical Integration is the way to go!

    If you build a product, control it throughout the process!

    For the life of me, I do not get the idea of buying any more components or elements from an outside party. Everyone imagines that there is some advantage to this.

    Show confidence in the abilities of your own people, and you can get it. Outside supplier? You may or may not get what you want, and you may never know if or why you are or are not getting it.

    I know this is theoretical. But I do know this. I am no longer in the auto business but was there on the manufacturer level. I have been out of it for about 20 years now.

    But at that time, only about 5 manufacturers built all of their own engines. They did buy components, but were solely responsible for the final product. Mercedes, BMW, Nissan, Honda, Toyota. that I know of. There may have been others. Maybe Subaru now, but at the time they bought a lot of drivetrain stuff from Nissan.

    Who still has the best quality engines in general? Guess who, it is the same list.

    Hmmmmmm………maybe something to that idea?

  3. “For the life of me, I do not get the idea of buying any more components or elements from an outside party. ” should have added: “than absolutely necessary”

    My proofreading department is asleep.

  4. @kenh

    Are you kidding me? Do you how much it would cost Apple to develop their own processors? Far more than they get in revenue each year for sure.

    Apple’s recent success has been largely due to adopting the Intel processors and motherboards. They significantly lower their costs by using industry standard components. They have experience no delay in obtaining materials and have been able to keep up with all the advances in multicore processors.

    Compare that with the PowerPC days where production issues produced delay after delay in product releases.

    Apple have not adopted the integrated graphics option for some products and chosen alternative graphics chips instead.

  5. So … Apple tells Intel “Integrated Graphics are unacceptable on Pro machines, and on higher-end consumer machines as well”. What’s Intel gonna do? There are really three choices: a) design the chip sets Apple wants, b) tell Apple to use the chip sets they sell and add in their own graphics cards, or c) tell the biggest purchasers of their high-end models to go suck eggs. OK, there’s little difference between b and c, mostly the attitude thing.
    Now, if Apple went back to designing their own chips, that might be a great solution. Or (G5) not. Not that the G5 was terrible, but where was the G5 laptop? Or Apple could chose to do business with AMD. Might propel that maker ahead of Intel … but not for a year or two. No great solutions here. I’m expecting the “b” option.

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