“Apple made news on on lots of fronts at its Worldwide Developers’ Conference Monday, with the new iPhone 3GS, a $100 iPhone 3G, and major notebook announcements. Almost lost in the iPhone and Mac Book announcements were several moves that add up to an assault on the enterprise, long Apple’s weakest market,” Stephen Wildstrom reports for BusinessWeek.

“The most intriguing announcement, partly because it was completely unexpected, is that Snow Leopard, the next version of the OS X operating system for Macs, will include built in support for Exchange, Microsoft’s enterprise mail and collaboration system. Snow Leopard is scheduled to ship in September and will cost $29 for a single copy or $49 for a family pack for up to five machines,” Wildstrom reports. “And new iPhone features seem to take aim at both Microsoft and Research In Motion, maker of the enterprise-oriented BlackBerry.”

MacDailyNews Note: It wasn’t unexpected. It was previously announced. Last year.

Wildstrom continues, “By building support for the Exchange infrastructure directly into the operating system, Apple has done something that Microsoft itself has never attempted. Apple says that in addition to reading mail, Mac users will see Exchange contacts in the Mac Address Book and Exchange calendar items in iCal. Integration extends to the ability to create meeting invitations simply by dragging contacts into an iCal appointment. You sure can’t do that in Outlook.”

“Apple has also beefed up the security features of the iPhone, another big deal for the enterprise,” Wildstrom reports. “The new iPhone will offer full encryption and the ability to wipe a phone to factory condition through Apple’s MobileMe service.”

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “James W.” for the heads up.]