Outspring Mail for Mac released; email client with a ‘brain’

“While many long-time Eudora users continue to bemoan Eudora’s fate, the developers of QuickMail, another email client that once boasted a significant user base, have released an entirely new email program, called Outspring Mail,” Adam C. Engst reports for TidBITS.

“Visually, Outspring Mail uses a three-pane interface, and the program offers all the basics, including support for POP, IMAP, SMTP, and SSL. From there, though, Outspring Mail provides the first notable rethinking of what an email client should do since the appearance of Google’s Gmail. Outspring Mail observes the user’s actions and learns from them, suggesting likely destination mailboxes for messages and even offering to use a previous reply to answer a frequently asked question,” Engst reports.

Full article here.

David Chartier reports for Ars Technica, “At first glance, Outspring Mail gets most of the basics right. Its default UI is the typical, efficient three-pane view utilizing a split horizontal list of messages and a preview pane below. A three-column widescreen view is available for those who don’t get much use out of scrolling through a list of subjects to cherry pick messages to read on a non-linear basis. An interesting perk of Outspring Mail’s UI is a tabbed interface for easy access to specific mailboxes and Smart Mailboxes.”

“While Outspring Mail introduces some intriguing new ways of managing e-mail, it drops the ball on some standard features in the process. One of Outspring Mail’s most touted new features is a “brain” that can learn from the ways you manually file messages. The brain can quickly begin to offer one-click options for where new messages should be filed. While I admittedly only used Outspring Mail for a few hours this morning, I found the brain to be really hit and miss with suggestions, even on messages I consider to be blatantly obvious,” Chartier reports.

While Outspring Mail introduces some intriguing new ways of managing e-mail, it drops the ball on some standard features in the process. One of Outspring Mail’s most touted new features is a ‘brain’ that can learn from the ways you manually file messages. The brain can quickly begin to offer one-click options for where new messages should be filed,” Chartier reports. “While I admittedly only used Outspring Mail for a few hours this morning, I found the brain to be really hit and miss with suggestions, even on messages I consider to be blatantly obvious.”

Chartier reports, “Shortcomings aside for a moment, Outspring Mail still does some good things.”

Full article here.

15 Comments

  1. Nearly a $100 for an email client with what Charteris describes as having “sluggish performance and lack of control”?

    The mind boggles.

    No thanks. Considering I can use Apple Mail, which while it has its faults is actually not a bad client, without paying out any extra, I can’t begin to imagine why I’d want this.

    If I were desperate not to use Apple Mail for some reason, I could download Thunderbird, Mulberry, or Alpine for nothing, or Gyazmail for a mere $18.

  2. Note for SilverHawk: Always best to breathe through the nose until you know what you’re talking about.

    Of course Mail is an application. It’s an email client application. As opposed to an email server application.

  3. I have to second Alansky’s comment. I’d also add that for a good many of us who must have the dreaded Microsoft Office bundle, we also have Entourage…I made the switch to Mail a couple of years ago and haven’t looked back!

  4. We’ve tested this email client and it kept crashing and didn’t allow us to set rules nor did it handle identities like Thunderbird, so what are we actually getting for $100. The answer is a cheap run down program filled with bugs, gee I wonder if they are associated with Microsoft in any way, over priced and full of bugs. lol

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