Developers ‘chomping at the virtual bit’ for Apple iPhone SDK

“Macworld may be over, but for a group of developers the most important Apple news has yet to be unveiled: the much-anticipated iPhone software development kit (SDK),” Elizabeth Woyke reports for Forbes.

“Developers say they can’t wait to get their hands on the SDK, which is expected to be released in late February and will allow third-party developers to create native applications for Apple’s iPhone. But developers are also anxious about how Apple may monitor and distribute applications. So far, Apple has been characteristically mum about its SDK-related plans,” Woyke reports.

“Most developers agree on one point: Developing for the iPhone, which has sold 4 million units since its late-June 2007 launch and quickly grabbed a leading share of mobile Internet traffic, is too great an opportunity to pass up,” Woyke reports.

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “MacVicta” for the heads up.]

44 Comments

  1. Notice that nobody is commenting on the actual story, since we’re all so fascinated by the headline? I think that that qualifies this as a ‘non-story’. Of COURSE the developers are . . .um, waiting with braided breath for the SDK! (Braided breath is accepted usage here in Sarasota. ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”grin” style=”border:0;” />

  2. Chomp, champ, chafe – according to our trusty dictionary that is built into Leopard, they all mean the same when used in that phrase.

    But to address the article, I guess all the doom and gloom about waning interest in the iPhone was just fodder to fill real and virtual editorial columns.

  3. Not just developers. End users like me are itching to buy some cool, wicked and insanely great stuff for the iPhone. It’s potential to blow the doors out of those other wannabe iPhone killers is just around the corner. I can’t wait.

  4. …developers are also anxious about how Apple may monitor and distribute applications. So far, Apple has been characteristically mum about its SDK-related plans,…

    Hmm let me guess…

    1: Allow third party apps only limited access.
    2: Copy third party apps, improve on them and make it part of the iPhone OS.
    3: Force third party to sue to no avail.
    4: PROFIT!!

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