Apple to license Exchange ActiveSync from Microsoft for iPhone?

“Apple’s iPhone is going to be compatible with Microsoft Exchange Server, after all,” Mary Jo Foley, yes, that Mary Jo Foley blogs for ZDNet.

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“My sources are saying Apple can and will make the iPhone compatible with Exchange Server,” Foley reports.

“Here’s what I’m hearing: Apple will announce this week — possibly as soon as June 27 — that it has licensed the Exchange ActiveSync licensing protocol. Via the licensing arrangement, Apple iPhone users will be able to connect to Exchange Server and make use of its wireless messaging and synchronization capabilities,” Foley reports.

“Microsoft currently makes the ActiveSync protocol available to interested parties via a pre-established licensing agreement,” Foley reports. “A number of phone vendors, including Nokia, Palm, Motorola and Sony Ericsson, already offer devices that sync with Exchange using ActiveSync.”

More in the full article here.

[UPDATED: 8:28pm EDT: This article was originally posted at 3:45pm EDT, but, er… duh, not made “live” to any section on the site.]

49 Comments

  1. “If this is in fact true, it is huge. No matter what we think of MS, the iPhone just became more of an “enterprise” device with this move.”

    I would have rather sat back and watched legions of MS IT drones scramble around in a snit as their customers (the people they work for) demand they make the iPhone work with their networks.

  2. Don’t be juvenile. Making the iPhone work with Exchange is one of the things that would keep it out of the hands of millions. If this story is true it’s a brilliant move on Apple’s part.

  3. I, of course, have no inside information on this matter, but I’m coming to the conclusion that this IS NOT going to happen. Of course, when it happens – as early as tomorrow – I’ll look pretty stupid, but here is my reasoning.

    Initially is sounds like a huge win for the iPhone to support Microsoft’s Enterprise. I read several comments under the original article that essentially felt it was a game changer and would move several business professionals to buy the iPhone. This would remove another barrier and might boost the iPhone’s initial sales further into the stratosphere.

    But I do not believe Apple want to bolster a proprietary system, especially one that is owned by Microsoft. The iPhone is going to be huge. If the enourmous pre-sale hype hasn’t been enough to convince, you, look at the extremely positive initial reviews. Apple has the leverage to break business free of Enterprise. The alternative – being reliant upon Microsoft to broker their way into the business world – is simply unacceptable.

    It’s an arrogant and risky view. But I believe it accurately reflects Apple’s position.

  4. “iPhone Server feature “

    It’s already there, in all versions of OS X Server that have shipped to date. It’s called an IMAP server. To turn it on, you check the box that says “be a mail server”.

    Blackberry invented their own half-assed reimplementation of e-mail. Apple uses the standards.

    -jcr

  5. “iPhone Server feature “

    It’s already there, in all versions of OS X Server that have shipped to date. It’s called an IMAP server. To turn it on, you check the box that says “be a mail server”.

    Blackberry invented their own half-assed reimplementation of e-mail. Apple uses the standards.

    -jcr

  6. “iPhone Server feature “

    It’s already there, in all versions of OS X Server that have shipped to date. It’s called an IMAP server. To turn it on, you check the box that says “be a mail server”.

    Blackberry invented their own half-assed reimplementation of e-mail. Apple uses the standards.

    -jcr

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