iPod and Intel halos shine upon Apple’s Mac

“Recent punditry suggests that the ‘halo effect’ between Apple’s iPod sales and purchases of Macintosh computers is either dimming or may be just a statistical error. But these industry watchers may be looking in the wrong places—Apple’s halo is shining on all the right people and may soon light up parts of the business market,” David Morgenstern writes for eWeek.

“I see signs that the Mac will continue its comeback and may be on the threshold of making a greater mark in the business market,” Morgenstern writes.

“I suggest that the iPod and the arrival of Intel-based Macs in the past year have had a more important “macro” influence on the market, with consumers and even with business customers,” Morgenstern writes. “While, there were considerable technical and value hurdles that users needed to overcome on the road to switching, the biggest obstacle to Mac adoption was the perception of Apple as a failing company… But Apple’s recent success with the iPod gave solid proof to the rest of the market (the other 96 percent or so) that the company would be sticking around for a while longer. The iPod became the engine of respectability that was able to pry the doom monkey off Apple’s back.”

Morgenstern writes, “In the past, before the change to Intel processors, there was a technical hurdle with the Mac for Windows customers. The PowerPC platform didn’t run Windows programs easily and quickly. And its performance and technology couldn’t be compared easily with the PC. Now it can.”

“From my own recent observations, this macro halo effect appears to be hitting across the board, including the top tier of customers—the very ones that common sense would tell us should be the most partisan of Windows supporters,” Morgenstern writes.

Morgenstern writes, “Apple keeps fooling our common sense. Many industry watchers keep waiting for some big splash from Apple toward the business market. A top-down marketing effort. That’s how it’s supposed to arrive.”

Full article – highly recommended – here.

Related articles:
Net Applications: Apple’s Mac market share continues rise, hits 6.22% in January 2007– February 01, 2007
Gartner: Apple’s U.S. Mac shipments up 30.6% year over year – January 18, 2007
Net Applications: Apple’s Mac market share continues rise, now at 5.39%, up 31% year-over-year – December 01, 2006
Apple’s Mac market share surges, up 35-percent year-over-year as growth accelerates – November 01, 2006
Analyst: Apple has ‘real shot at dramatically expanding Macintosh market share’ – October 31, 2006
Analyst: Apple Mac gains market share, the reason why is significant – October 26, 2006
IDC: Apple Mac attained 5.8% of U.S. market share in Q3 06 – October 18, 2006
Gartner: Apple Mac grabbed 6.1% of U.S. market share in Q3 06 – October 18, 2006
Gartner: Apple Mac grabbed 4.6% U.S. market share in Q2 06 – July 19, 2006
IDC: Apple Mac attained 4.8% U.S. market share in Q2 06 – July 19, 2006

21 Comments

  1. I am proof of the iPod halo effect. If it weren’t for my U2 special edition iPod that I bought two years ago I never would have thought of looking at Macs. The iPod was so well done and easy to use, however, that I found myself in an Apple store shortly after purchase and within four months of owning my iPod I was a Mac user as well.

  2. “So why are Mac desktop sales down by so much?” two reasons. Adobe (or lack of Adobe) products, and the mainstream move to mobile computing. Nowadays kids are getting laptops, at the start of the millenium, they were reserved for the business types, or those with big bucks. (laptops, not kids)

  3. goriffic,

    Apple’s recent earnings and unit sales information:

    2004:
    • Q1 (ended 12/27/03): revenue of $2.006 billion, net quarterly profit of $63 million, 829,000 Macs, 733,000 iPods
    • Q2 (ended 03/27/04): revenue of $1.909 billion, net quarterly profit of $14 million, 749,000 Macs, 807,000 iPods
    • Q3 (ended 06/26/04): revenue of $2.014 billion, net quarterly profit of $61 million, 876,000 Macs, 860,000 iPods
    • Q4 (ended 09/25/04): revenue of $2.350 billion, net quarterly profit of $106 million, 836,000 Macs, 02.016 million iPods

    2005:
    • Q1 (ended 12/25/04): revenue of $3.49 billion, net quarterly profit of $295 million, 1.046 million Macs, 04.580 million iPods
    • Q2 (ended 03/26/05): revenue of $3.24 billion, net quarterly profit of $290 million, 1.070 million Macs, 05.311 million iPods
    • Q3 (ended 07/13/05): revenue of $3.52 billion, net quarterly profit of $320 million, 1.182 million Macs, 06.155 million iPods
    • Q4 (ended 10/11/05): revenue of $3.68 billion, net quarterly profit of $430 million, 1.236 million Macs, 06.451 million iPods

    2006:
    • Q1 (ended 12/31/05): revenue of $5.75 billion, net quarterly profit of $565 million, 1.254 million Macs, 14.043 million iPods
    • Q2 (ended 04/01/06): revenue of $4.36 billion, net quarterly profit of $410 million, 1.112 million Macs, 08.526 million iPods
    • Q3 (ended 07/01/06): revenue of $4.37 billion, net quarterly profit of $472 million, 1.327 million Macs, 08.111 million iPods
    • Q4 (ended 09/30/06): revenue of $4.84 billion, net quarterly profit of $546 million, 1.610 million Macs, 08.729 million iPods

    2007:
    • Q1 (ended 12/30/06): revenue of $7.10 billion, net quarterly profit of $1 billion, 1.606 million Macs, 21.066 million iPods

    Source: http://www.macdailynews.com/index.php/weblog/comments/12411/

  4. Floola —- Cool idea. why doesn´t MDN ever cover alternative ideas when using Apple products???
    As it says at Lifehacker….

    “Why would I want to do this?

    If you’ve never felt restricted by iTunes, then this probably isn’t for you. iTunes is a pretty good music management application, but it has limitations. If you’ve bumped up against these limitations one too many times (like iTunes’ lock-in of your iPod to one music library), you may be ready to ditch iTunes altogether in order to get what you want. That’s what this article is about.”

  5. Factchecker – blarghhhh…..that waste of space you did says nothing.
    Your info does not break out desktop and notebook sales.
    Before you get the facts, first understand the question.

    Dig deeper and you will find what Apple reported – desktop sales way below projection.

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