Apple places last in Greenpeace ‘Guide to Greener Electronics’ report

“There are encouraging signs that electronic goods such as PCs and mobile phones could become ‘greener’, according to the latest review of electronics manufacturers’ policies published by Greenpeace today. The latest version of the Greenpeace ‘Guide to Greener Electronics’ (1) which ranks 14 top manufacturers of PC’s and mobile phones, shows that most companies have demonstrated commitments to greener manufacturing processes, such as eliminating the use of the most hazardous chemicals, and recycling policies such as financing take-back, reuse or recycling of end-of-life products. Apple, however, lags far behind the competition, presently occupying the last place in the ranking guide,” Greenpeace International writes.

Greenpeace writes, “Nokia continues to hold the top spot in the ranking, with progressive policies on both, its chemicals policy as well as disposal of electronic waste. However, the company is yet to outline clear timelines for phasing out PVC in all its products. ‘In sharp contrast, Apple is awarded the last position because the company has made absolutely no improvements to its policies or practices since the ranking was first released three months ago, although most of its competitors have improved environmental policies,’ said Iza Kruszewska, Greenpeace International toxics campaigner, in the press release, ‘Despite being the world leader in innovation and design, Apple is losing the race by failing to keep up with the other companies.'”

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “obvious” for the heads up.]
These Greenpeaceniks might have a point if Apple was some massive polluter instead of just a very a popular brand name which these militant “environmentalists” are using to generate free publicity. We’re all for a cleaner environment, but Apple ought to charge Greenpeace a PR fee. Apple doesn’t sell dirty CRT monitors, like certain cheapo Windows-centric PC box assemblers. Apple uses rechargeable batteries in iPods, instead of having tens of millions of users constantly tossing AA batteries into landfills. Apple even offers purchasers of Apple Macs and Apple monitors free recycling of their old computer and monitor — regardless of manufacturer. The list goes on.

Information on Apple’s recycling programs and industry-leading environmental policies is available online at http://www.apple.com/environment

Related articles:
Mac Expo evicts Greenpeace campaigners – October 26, 2006
Is Greenpeace lying about Apple’s ‘toxic laptops?’ – September 25, 2006
What kind of green are ‘environmental extortionists’ really after? – September 06, 2006
Greenpeace ‘Guide to Greener Electronics’ report called ‘misleading and incompetent’ – September 02, 2006
Greenpeace criticizes Apple over toxic waste – August 29, 2006
Apple offers free computer take-back recycling program – April 21, 2006
Defiant Steve Jobs calls environmentalists’ claims ‘B.S.’ – April 22, 2005

48 Comments

  1. Greenpeace isn’t interested in the environment so much as they are interested in the publicity they get, which tranlates to donations.

    Greenpeace has been corrupted the same way every other institution gets corrupted. After the first generation of volunteers/founders exits management, the second generation thinks of nothing except perpetuating the instituttion, and that takes money.

    Today’s environmentalists are whores in pursuit of the dollar they contend is the root of all evil.

  2. Maybe Greenpeace is right…Apple was compared to other electronics manufacturers, not other polluters in general, and still fared poorly in their study.

    The bottom line is, in a country where the administration has effectively gutted environmental protections, we need watchdog groups like Greenpeace to call companies on their behavior.

  3. As valued as it is, traditional hunting in Greenland is under tremendous stress. Pressure from environmental and conservation groups has led Greenland’s Home Rule Government to set hunting limits for most species. In January 2006, a 150 animal limit was set for the most prized of all Greenlandic animals, the polar bear. Hunters in the region say it is hard to survive on the quotas that have been established.
    Excerpt about the Culture of Greenland from Wikipedia

    “This is especially true due to the dramatic drop in seal skin prices in the late 1980s. That drop occurred after environmental pressure led to a collapse of the seal skin market in the United States. Today, the price of the skins remains so low that most Thule hunters tan only enough skins for personal use; they no longer process them for sale. Moreover, when asked what the single greatest threat to the traditional culture is, Qaanaaq hunter Lars Jeremiassen quickly replied, “Greenpeace”. That response, (documented in 2006 by the Arctic I.CC.E. Project: Indigenous Climate Change Ethnographies,[1]) reflects the devastating effect that environmentalist-led protests against sealing and seal products have had on the Inuit way of life, not just in Greenland, but throughout the Arctic.”

    I believe in enviromental conservation, but I think Greenpeace’s tactics are assinine. Start with education and finding sustainable solutions. If you want enviromentalism to make a huge impact you have to make uncumbersome to the way people live, survive and conduct business. Unfortunately to succeed long term you have make a more gradual shift.

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