Apple squawks over ‘podcast’ use

“Apple Computer is apparently cracking down on the use of the term ‘podcast,’ which refers to audio or video files distributed online, and plays off of the company’s popular iPod player. According to Wired’s Listening Post blog, the company has fired off a letter to start-up Podcast Ready, stating that the terms ‘Podcast Ready’ and ‘myPodder’ infringe on its trademarks,” Margaret Kane blogs for CNET.

Kane writes, “Apple’s legal team is no slouch when it comes to defending trademarks; the company has gone after firms using the ‘pod’ term before. In a stunning turn of events, bloggers did not leap to defend Apple. Some even went so far as to fault the company for its heavy-handed legal tactics.”

Full article here.

Related articles:
iPod Garage to evolve into iProng on May 8th – April 26, 2006
Apple legal team pressures ‘iPodder Lemon’ name change to ‘Juice’ – November 15, 2005

43 Comments

  1. “In a stunning turn of events, bloggers did not leap to defend Apple. Some even went so far as to fault the company for its heavy-handed legal tactics.”

    Yeah, rrrrrright. I must have been imagining all the fierce criticism Apple has come under in the past when they’ve sued over trademarks.
    Then again it is CNET.

    As for the case itself, pretty lame considering the term Podcast was invented by the community, therefore I can’t see it being trademarkable.

  2. Come on– is THIS really necessary to defend one’s trademark in the 21st century? Do they really HAVE TO go after anything with ‘pod’ in it just to keep their trademark secure?

    Seems as though the lawyers may be advising something that Apple really may not WANT to do, but that they’re being told they HAVE to do.

  3. APPLE! You have created a monster with your Apple Legal Team, your killing off your evangelists that have remained so loyal, and destroying the foundations under what this company was built upon.

    Nice and smooth, guys! You’re turning into M$!

  4. Apple legal probably reckon that it’s just a short hop between this use of the ‘Pod’ word and somebody actually trying to use it to sell some sort of MP3 equipment but for the sake of good PR, they should hold their fire until the worst actually happens.

  5. The inventor of the term “podcast” very specifically states it was a conjunction of the terms “iPod” and “broadcast” – and Apple owns one of those.
    Which doesn’t make their touchiness smart or ‘right’, but does make it defensible.
    My own show could be impacted if they go after my host, PodOmatic, but I’ll still have my iTunes feed … even if I need to change providers (or the URL of my provider changes. As my ‘cast is done as a weekly radio show focused on local (local – mainly my wife’s friends and works) theater, I refer to my efforts as “shows”. Apple will not be coming after my personal butt on this any time soon.

  6. Please, Apple let’s not kill the positive image you’ve worked sao DAMN hard and long to establish.

    Why not ask for credits or display of the Apple logo or links to the Apple iPod web site instead of sicking the lawyer hounds on the “offending” sites!

  7. Normally I think Apple is smart, but this is just a dumbass move. Why would you not want a word that derives from the very name of your successful product not to be embedded in the national lexicon?

    Let it go Apple. Better yet, drown a lawyer, then let it go.

  8. Actually I probably should read the article before shooting my mouth off.

    They are going after a company thats creating a product that uses the word ‘podcast’ as part of its trademark. That’s a different story IMHO. They aren’t going after general use of the word Podcast, which I assumed before I read the article.

    No company should be able to use that word I don’t think.

    Drowning a lawyer would still be a good idea though I think.

    Dimplemonkey, you need to ease up. Apple isn’t “killing off your evangelists that have remained so loyal, and destroying the foundations under what this company was built upon.”

    The zealous energy that the Apple base demonstrates is more a matter of smart marketing than it is a founding principle that the company was founded on.

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