With Vista transition, Microsoft should take a lesson from Apple

“The looming choice for Windows users is either to stick with Windows XP (and older hardware) or take Windows Vista cold turkey. But Microsoft doesn’t have to be so tough—Apple did it differently with the Mac OS X rollout,” David Morgenstern writes for eWeek.

“While Microsoft’s approach to the 2007 launch of Windows Vista is only now coming into focus, it looks as if the Vista experience will stand in sharp contrast to the way Apple pitched the Mac community on its OS X transition,” Morgenstern writes. “Based on the response to a recent column on Vista’s hardware requirements and performance, it looks as if many readers will be taking a wait-and-see attitude to the upgrade. Most didn’t see much value in moving from Windows XP.”

Morgenstern writes, “Unlike the situation with Vista, Mac users had plenty of time—more than a year and a half—to ignore the new OS if they chose to do so. Customers could make up their minds about OS X in their own time frame and still have the security of knowing their existing workflows would be maintained while upgrading hardware. In fact, support for the Classic environment was only stopped with the release of Intel-based Macs.”

Morgenstern writes, “By my reckoning, Microsoft is sending the opposite message with its Vista rollout: You will be grateful for the ‘Windows Vista Experience’—Period!”

“Oh, and here’s an item for those who harp on the price of Macs. Take a look at the reported savings on ‘additional’ licenses for Vista owners. You will save between $10 and $40 off the price of each additional license when you upgrade or buy Vista new. Apple offers a ‘family’ 5-pack license, with each seat costing $40 each. That’s real savings,” Morgenstern writes.

Full article here.

Related MacDailyNews article:
$399 for Windows Vista Ultimate?! (Hint: Get a Mac) – August 29, 2006

20 Comments

  1. Because we here at Microsoft know better. We don’t give a damn about what the customer thinks. Users are stupid and their opinions don’t matter. Besides, we have bills to pay.

    Microsoft: The geek shall inherit the earth.
    Microsoft: The place where “no” really means “yes”.

    MDW is evidence. As in here’s is evidence of what I just said.
    http://www.macdailynews.com/index.php/weblog/comments/writer_invoices_bill_gates_for_microsoft_sabotage/ Though I still think he should’ve backed up.

  2. Rave on. No matter how awful it is, Vista’s launch will fully eclipse Mac OS, no matter how much better it is.

    The only way for Apple to deal with this reality is to accelerate the real performance of its software and machinery. Ditch the hype and deliver the goods – that’s all that will matter when the MS marketers take center stage.

    And, Thorin – so do you! The difference is that my position is visionary – you’ll see.

  3. What I can’t work out is – if Peterson is such a genius – why doesn’t he go and apply for a job at Apple. Because presumably he can tell them how to get even more performance out of a Woodcrest Xeon. Or maybe he’s just a bozo who knows nothing about anything.

  4. Actually Windows users have a third choice: Mac OS X.
    No matter what garish “eye candy” Vista has, it will still work the same as XP, whereas OS X is a whole different way of doing things that will excite any Windows users who bother to investigate.

  5. Why would anyone be in a hurry for vista?

    No improved efficiency, no improved reliability, it’s not cheaper and so far it does not work better.

    Nothing compelling about any of that.

  6. I don’t want to work for Apple – I want to encourage Apple’s loyal customers (among whom I am one) to demand they cease manipulating us, take a broader view of their potential beyond their pitiful market share, and sieze the moment with break away software and hardware performance.

    Instead of running ads depicting PC as a dufus, they need to first, deliver true performance superiority (what they have now is better than MS stuff but not a lot better) and second, to drive home that message through truth instead of comparisons to an inferior standard.

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