NY Times covers the basics of switching from Windows PC to Apple Mac

“Ten years ago, if you were a Windows user, the idea of switching to a Macintosh might not have seemed enticing. An abundance of new Windows software was arriving on store shelves, while the selection available to Mac users seemed to be falling behind, often relegated to a back corner of the same store,” Thomas J. Fitzgerald reports for The New York Times.

“Today the calculation is different. Apple Computer, through a series of transitions, has reinvented itself. With a new operating system, its own chain of retail stores, the iPod and now a new line of computers that run on Intel processors, this new and more mainstream Apple is catching the attention of Windows users, and many are curious about switching,” Fitzgerald reports.

Fitzgerald covers the basics of upgrading your personal computer experience from a Windows PC to Mac OS X machine, including software, Boot Camp and Parallels Desktop for Mac for running Windows applications, and security. Of the latter, Fitzgerald writes, “Security is another aspect of Macs that has Windows users curious. In Windows, antivirus and antispyware programs have become essential for defending against a variety of threats. So far, the Mac OS X operating system has not been infiltrated by viruses, and it remains free from the type of spyware threats that spread in the wild and go after Windows users, according to Symantec, maker of Norton Antivirus. But when Windows is run on Intel-based Macs, for example through Boot Camp or Parallels, it is vulnerable to the same virus and spyware threats that can affect conventional Windows-based PC’s.”

Fitzgerald also covers hardware and also includes a brief bit about switchers’ experiences in the full article here.

Related articles:
Liberal blogger on switch from Windows to Mac: I’m sold – August 03, 2006
Top Ten Reasons I’m Glad I’m a Mac Switcher – June 20, 2006
Switching To The Mac: A Guide For Windows Users – June 15, 2006
Detroit Free Press’ Wendland: Apple MacBook Pro ‘the finest portable computer I have ever owned’ – March 14, 2006
Sydney Morning Herald Tech columnist dumps Microsoft Windows, switches to Apple Mac – June 13, 2006
Moving Microsoft Internet Explorer Favorites to Apple Safari Bookmarks when you switch – June 08, 2006
Apple Boot Camp’s ‘Windows Insecurity Blanket’ helps buyers decide to switch to Macs – May 19, 2006
PC Magazine: Top ten questions and answers about switching to Apple Macintosh – May 18, 2006
A switcher’s guide to Windows, Mac OS X – April 25, 2006
Macs that run Windows will calm potential switchers’ irrational fears – April 06, 2006

68 Comments

  1. Apple has reinvented itself in the past few years. I fondly recall the change in energy as Steve would successively release the next piece of the puzzle. It was electrifying. It was the realization that there was a grand scheme in play, and that it was being executed so well that prompted me to buy stock. Best financial decision I ever made.

    The rest of the world is still early to catch on to this bandwagon. More change is in the works. Apple is becoming mainstream, while remaining cool and unique in tech.

  2. So/so article. The author avoided many of the typical pitfalls (e.g., security through obscurity) and provided some useful information, but he also missed many things. For example, his statement that there could be compatibility issues for a Mac with peripherals, printers, etc., is SOMETIMES true (esp. with older peripherals/legacy ports), but he doesn’t mention that the Mac also has BETTER compatibility with some peripherals than Windows computers (e.g., drivers, plug-and-play). Also, no mention of iLife at all, or Spotlight, or Expose, and the odd notion that a Windows-based Vaio has better graphics/is “livelier.” The article IS overall slightly positive and more accurate than not.
    I grade this one a “B-“.

  3. MAc 7

    And you do?

    Why do you suppose Apple is where it is now if not for the reinvention that Jobs has done to a great but small company?

    Had it not been for the recent – 5years or so -changes Apple would still be a small player. It took a drastic shift in direction to bring it to where it is now; Including the shift to Intel. Did you anticipate that? No I didn’t think so,

    The Mac interface is the closest to the PC it has ever been not because of envy on the part of Apple but to a clever plot to make the transition easier to does who found the earlier and amazing Mac interface too different for them to switch. If you had been an long time user as most of us here you would know what NYTs is talking about.

    Bitchin for the sake of bitching is surely your right but counter-productive all the same.

  4. Mac7, I fear ’tis you who are the clueless one. Ten years ago Apple was not on Intel (not that I thought this was a Bad Thing), had a model range confusing to everyone, and the OS … wasn’t quite OS X, now, was it! Today that has all changed, and all for the better. Plus, today we can compare a given Mac with a comparable PC and show they are also price-competetive. Plus, today we have Xserve and Xraid that are gaining ground in (mostly small) business spaces.Plus we have iLife and iWork – in addition to a not-all-that-different AppleWorks. And then, there’s the iTunes/iPod franchise drawing eyeballs and hearts.

    Apple has re-invented itself just in this decade, never mind the baby steps it took late last decade.

  5. Mac7 –

    In some ways, it is fair to say that Apple has invented itself but you need to look at the time between Jobs leaving and Jobs coming back when the company started to lose focus and then drift with a bloated product line and time/money spent on projects that were never going to come to fruition (taligent anyone?).

    So it’s not an insult to say that the company re-invented itself since it went from good to (Jobs inspired) excellent.

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