Intel starts up internal ‘Apple group’

“Industry analysts and others have confirmed that Intel Corp. has formed an internal ‘Apple group.’ This group, formed in the wake of Apple Computer Inc.’s decision to base its next generation of Macintosh computers on Intel processors, is comprised of engineers and sales staff,” Daniel Drew Turner reports for eWeek. “Intel has similar groups for other large clients such as Lenovo and Hewlett-Packard. Specifics on the Apple group are sparse, however. Details are considered confidential internal information, said Intel representative Tom Beerman.”

“‘Intel’s goal is to sell as many chips as possible, of course,’ said Mark Margevicius, a research director at the industry analysis firm Gartner Inc. Towards that, he said, Intel sets up groups ‘to work with as many unique suppliers as possible.’ He also noted that although the official Apple group is new, Intel has had ‘skunkwork’ operations over the years to demonstrate technologies to potential customer Apple. Apple CEO Steve Jobs has admitted that Apple has long maintained an Intel-compatible version of Mac OS X, code-named Marklar,” Turner reports.

Full article here.

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14 Comments

  1. I believe these processors may run faster that the G5. What do you guys think? Intel has changed the way they run and cut down on the speed but shortened the length of time it takes to process the information, I’ve heard.

  2. Jobs has admitted that Apple has long maintained an Intel-compatible version of Mac OS X, code-named Marklar

    Not to mention a just-in-case pro business suite called Marklar or a pro image suite called Marklar … because in Marklar, everything and everyone is called Marklar.

    MW: “coming,” as in the Marklars are….

  3. Actually cb, you are thinking of the wrong episode. The episode with Marklar is Starvin Marvin in Space. The one with Pat Robertson and the Christians and the space ship that took them to Marklar. One of my all time favorite episodes actually.

  4. Real Deal says: “I believe these processors may run faster that the G5. What do you guys think? Intel has changed the way they run and cut down on the speed but shortened the length of time it takes to process the information, I’ve heard.”

    From the information that’s already been released, the Yonah CPUs will be essentially Pentium M times 2. Software optimized for multithreading will get boosted, and the CPUs will be pretty efficient (though dual cores use more energy than single cores), however … the Pentium M is a poor CPU when it comes to multimedia performance. Specifically, it’s floating point performance has never been up to par with desktop oriented Pentiums, which in turn have not performed as well as G5s.

    So the dual core G5s Apple is now using will still rule the roost in outright processing power for a while, at least until the follow-on to the Pentium D arrives (mid to late 2006), which should be the chip for the new PowerMacs. And maybe the G5 will hold it’s own even then … the 970 is a very good chip, and who knows whether IBM improves it, and/or Apple adopts it, prior to the PowerMacintel release. Realistically, neither is likely to happen. Freescale had some nice G4 upgrades available for these recent PowerBook revisions, but Apple avoided them – probably to allow the new Macintel laptops to look that much better in comparision. But you never know.

    On the other hand, just as there’s a thriving G4 CPU upgrade market for the various models that came with slower versions of that chip originally, I have a feeling similar CPU upgrades will be made available for the G5 PowerMacs for years to come. Won’t that will make for some interesting ‘system shootouts’ (I can see the MacWorld cover story now; “Improved’ G5s vs New Macintels: Was the Transition Worth It?”)

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