Microsoft Office alternatives for Mac OS X coming soon

“Major milestones were recently announced for two Mac OS X-compatible software suites that could provide an alternative to the near-ubiquitous Microsoft Office. The free NeoOffice/J, an open-source software development project created by Patrick Luby and Edward Peterlin, has reached its ‘first stable release,’ and South Korea-based Haansoft has announced that it will ship a Mac OS X version of its ThinkFree Office 3.0 suite close on the heels of the July release of the Windows version,” Daniel Drew Turner reports for eWeek.

More info about NeoOffice/J: http://www.planamesa.com/neojava/en/index.php

More info about ThinkFree Office: http://www.thinkfree.com/

Full article here.

MacDailyNews Note: Also, note that Apple’s AppleWorks provides Microsoft Word and Excel compatibility and Apple’s Keynote (part of iWork) imports and exports Microsoft PowerPoint presentations. Apple’s Pages (also part of iWork) also imports and exports Microsoft Word documents. And Apple’s Filemaker also imports Microsoft Excel files and Access data and instantly converts Microsoft Excel files to FileMaker databases.

31 Comments

  1. True about the Apple Alternatives, although it’s expensive to buy multiple programs, not to mention that some of them aren’t that good (tried Pages, didn’t like it as a writing program…)

  2. I use NeoOffice on occasion. While it works pretty well, it is no match for MS Office. But then again, if I didn’t need all the features and workflow speed of MS Office, I may go with the free NeoOffice.

    Free vs. $149… isn’t something to be ignored. Right now, I’d take the $149 MS Office.

  3. I use NeoOffice on occasion. While it works pretty well, it is no match for MS Office. But then again, if I didn’t need all the features and workflow speed of MS Office, I may go with the free NeoOffice.

    Free vs. $149… isn’t something to be ignored. Right now, I’d take the $149 MS Office.

  4. I use NeoOffice on occasion. While it works pretty well, it is no match for MS Office. But then again, if I didn’t need all the features and workflow speed of MS Office, I may go with the free NeoOffice.

    Free vs. $149… isn’t something to be ignored. Right now, I’d take the $149 MS Office.

  5. I used OpenOffice on Linux, and now I use MS Office on the Mac, and I think that OpenOffice is superior in just about every way to MS office. I get really frustrated with MS Office’s sluggish response times (eg when scrolling), it’s stupid fade-away eye-candy panels that are hell to navigate, and it’s slow startup times. Given that the hardware I was running OO on was much slower than my 1.25 Ghz PB, and I really can’t see how MS Office can be favourably compared to OO.

    I really, really wish there was an Aqua-native port of OO to OSX.

  6. >CeeDee Burner: Hmmm you guys actually pay for Office? Totally unnecessary.

    Free vs. $149-$350 can mean different things to different users.

    The (free) NeoOffice may be more costly for some. Time is money!

  7. >CeeDee Burner: Hmmm you guys actually pay for Office? Totally unnecessary.

    Free vs. $149-$350 can mean different things to different users.

    The (free) NeoOffice may be more costly for some. Time is money!

  8. >CeeDee Burner: Hmmm you guys actually pay for Office? Totally unnecessary.

    Free vs. $149-$350 can mean different things to different users.

    The (free) NeoOffice may be more costly for some. Time is money!

  9. Apple works does not support Excel sufficiently for most usages. Importing workbooks with multiple tabs creates a single sheet monstrosity that is very difficult to deal with.

    NeoOffice is reasonably better at this, but it is not a drop-in replacement for MSOffice. For instance importing a tab-delimited text file means selecting tab-delimited file-type when opening it. When exporting a tab delimited-file, select a Windows character set for compatibility. UTF-8 doesn’t seem to be universal.

    I like NeoOffice and use it everyday, but it has been a bit of a struggle.

  10. Pages is a nice combination of word processor and page layout program, but has no support for bibliographies (e.g. EndNote or Bookends). Without such support, it cannot be used for serious writing, which is exactly when the page layout features would be useful.

    I have contacted the developers of Bookends bibliography software, and they claim that Pages is not designed to allow third party applications to interact with it. If that is so, and will be typical of Apple’s new applications, it would be a real shame. Apple should be trying to help its third party developers, not shutting them out.

  11. “And Apple’s Filemaker also imports Microsoft Excel files and Access data and instantly converts Microsoft Excel files to FileMaker databases.”

    Technically correct, even if you have to work afterwards to make them look and behave like databases. (FMP only imports/converts the cell content, but no calcs and the likes).

    And FileMaker only costs, what, about $300 to $400 per license…
    Why? Because it is a relational database that does far more than a spreadsheet. Using FileMaker for opening a simple spreadsheet is shooting with a cannon at a mosquito.

    Bit of a wanting comparison, MDN. Yes, there are alternatives to Office, but if you want to compare FMP with an M$ Product, you should be comparing it to Access.

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