EU court dismisses Microsoft’s plea for appeal ‘in its entirety’

“A European court has turned down an appeal by Microsoft to delay hard-hitting sanctions from the European Commission. The US software giant went to the European Court of First Instance to try to get the penalties for abuse of monopoly suspended. Microsoft wanted to delay the opening up of aspects of its Windows software system to rivals, and a record EU fine. The court dismissed Microsoft’s plea ‘in its entirety,'” BBC News reports.

“Microsoft said after the judgement that it remained confident of coming to an agreement with the Commission. In March, the European Commission imposed the sanctions on Microsoft after finding that it had abused the virtual monopoly of its Windows computer operating system,” BBC News reports. “The Commission demanded Microsoft change its business practices, and levied a fine of 497m euros ($613m), the biggest it had ever imposed in an anti-trust case.”

“The failure of its initial appeal could have huge commercial implications for the company, since the Commission ordered it to divulge some software secrets and produce a version of Windows without its digital Media Player,” BBC News reports. “The Commission’s case against Microsoft centred on the software giant’s digital Media Player which it includes as part of its Windows operating system. Brussels determined that the inclusion of Media Player was an abuse of monopoly as it made it very difficult for rivals such as RealNetworks and Apple’s QuickTime to get consumers to use their products instead.”

“The Commission also called for Microsoft to reveal key parts of its software code to enable other software and hardware manufacturers to more easily develop products that work with Windows,” BBC News reports. “The European Court of First Instance is the second-highest court in the EU. However, Microsoft could now take its appeal higher, to the European Court of Justice. The full appeals process could take up to five years, prompting speculation among IT analysts that Microsoft may have been hoping to persuade the Commission to reopen negotiations – halted before the March ruling – on remedies.”

Full article here.

27 Comments

  1. In 5 years they can rack up attorney’s fee of probably around $613m……mind as well as pay the darn fine and be done with it. Oh…..they are confident and principles, I forgot.

  2. Alright Europeans, you’re doing good. The Bush Administration allows Micosoft to abuse its monopoly power over here in the U.S., no problem. Glad to see y’all are smarter than that. Or maybe it’s just that your authorities haven’t been bought off, at least not yet?

  3. 1) Bush doesnt run the wasnt the prosecuter or the judge in the MS trial, so get over it.

    2) Quicktime is already on the PC.

    Lets think a liitle before we speak

    and MERRY CHRISTMAS

  4. And anyway, I don’t understand it. It would essentially amount to the same if Apple were asked to remove QuickTime, iTunes and all the other iLife Apps, because it would be unfair business practice.

    let the suckers who buy windows (PC/Windows iPod owners are suckers on the way to rehabilitation) stick to their WMP.

    And like the magic word “glass” , is what I raise to the cult of mac users out there…

  5. Buffy, I know that its on the PC as in ported for PC, but not everyone has it installed, or even knows about it. What I am saying, is that if you have a crappy car, putting an excellent Audio System in it will not increase its value or performance.

    going going “gone”

  6. Buffy wrote: “Dont I look silly”. Yes, I’d say so. But not just because of the typos in a massage that advises us to “think a liitle before we speak.” I’d say that the silliness is in failing to see that Bush controls the U.S. Department of Justice, whose anti-trust division is letting Microsoft abuse it’s monopoly power. But we can agree on the “MERRY CHRISTMAS” part.

  7. ph8te wrote:
    “And anyway, I don’t understand it. It would essentially amount to the same if Apple were asked to remove QuickTime, iTunes and all the other iLife Apps, because it would be unfair business practice.”

    I don’t think it would be the same if the Courts asked Apple to remove QT, iTumes and all the other iLife apps. This applications come pre-packaged with the Mac but can be safely removed (just drag it to the trash if you want) at the will of the user whom might want to use some other apps in their place. They are not tied to the OS.

    Now try doing the same on windoze by removing the Media Player or IE and see how your machine is rendered useless. As these two things are root so firmly in the OS that it is near impossible to remove them.

  8. Typical–smear someone you disagree with, without any evidence. If the individual is a politician, does that make it OK? Or are you such egomaniacs that you think the only reason someone could disagree with your brilliant insights is that he or she is on the take?
    Disgusting.

  9. Typical–smear someone you disagree with, without any evidence. If the individual is a politician, does that make it OK? Or are you such egomaniacs that you think the only reason someone could disagree with your brilliant insights is that he or she is on the take?
    Disgusting.

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