Jewish World Review: Apple iPod mini – ‘there’s no equal’

“Apple’s new iPod Mini, retail price $249, evokes in me a feeling not unlike that of actor Bill Murray in the movie ‘Groundhog Day,’ awakening to repeat a soon-familiar cycle all over again. I’ve been here before: The Mini, after all, is a digital music player like its larger siblings. The device holds only 1,000 songs, or thereabouts, on its 4 gigabytes of memory, but the interface and software are the same as on the larger, more expensive models,” Mark Kellner writes for Jewish World Review.

“The key difference is the very small size, which is about that of a credit card, and the thickness of a small memo pad. This product is so small, it settled nicely in a jacket pocket and remained there for a couple of days – I’d forgotten its presence. According to Apple Computer, it’s 45 percent lighter and 50 percent smaller than the original 1,000-song iPod introduced in 2001,” Kellner writes.

“But don’t let the diminutive size of this new device fool you. The sound that comes out of this device is as big and bold and beautiful as any digital music player out there. It’s the perfect companion for a waiting room, long plane ride (battery life is up to 8 hours) or just about anywhere. Optional speakers can make this one of the smallest stereo systems in the world; play it through your car stereo and you can drive from Washington to Providence, Rhode Island, and perhaps never hear the same song twice,” Kellner writes.

“All this recalls experiences with earlier iPods, and all of this explains why the iPod is rather unique. Other music players offer digital listening, but are often larger, clunkier and otherwise less inviting than the iPod. Those others may be suitable to some; a friend just swapped out one hard drive for an 80 Gigabyte drive in his music player, resulting in a gigantic library that’s thoroughly portable,” Kellner writes. “But for those wanting not only music and portability, but also style and panache, there’s no equal to the iPod. Its sleek design is a marvel that can be operated with one hand. Its sound, through stereo headphones or via connector to a car stereo, is, as I said, astonishing. And all of it comes in a tiny package that reflects tremendous care in design.”

Kellner writes, “Fortunately, the iPod Mini will work with both Windows PCs and Macintosh computers; since Apple offers iTunes software for both platforms. This also gives users access to an online music store whose library is huge, and growing.”

Full article here.

11 Comments

  1. Oy Vey!

    I’m slowly turning into the nice Jewish boy that my mum wanted me to be and I have the digital music player to prove it!

    iPod: the player for every political and religious persuasion ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”grin” style=”border:0;” />

  2. So show me a better WMA player already.
    These meshugah PC analysts should stop their kvetching, get their shmeckles snipped and join the rest of us.
    GEVALT!

  3. Did you guys see that Seinfeld episode where the Russian writer throws an iPod mini out the window of a limo and hits a girl in the head…?

    hahaha… and elaine has to go back and get money to pay for the bill..

    you should go get it at the iMovie Store..

  4. MDN, please keep religion and politics free from our love of our Macs

    Unless you would like to include the Palestinian World Review or the Jews for Jesus, or Skinheads Opinion.

    Your must be desperate to be willing to risk those kind of people coming by and flooding your site full of hate or politics.

    If you need a example just go see the hate going on at SpyMac, it’s sickening.

    We all love our Macs, we don’t need politics or hate here.

    Thank you

  5. Hey oh brother…

    RELAX!
    It was an article in a magazine. There was no religion mentioned at all.
    I don’t recall seeing “Jews would be better served with AAC files from iTunes Music Store” anywhere in the article.

    Less caffeine, that’s the secret!

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