“Amidst reports of layoffs across Apple’s rumored car division, I fielded several calls from reporters who assumed the news meant Project Titan was dead and Apple had abandoned car-related efforts altogether,” Tim Bajarin writes for PC Magazine. “That’s absurd. If Cupertino was killing Project Titan, why would it bring back Bob Mansfield, former vice president of engineering, to manage the project? Instead, I imagine Mansfield returned, assessed Project Titan, and tightened its focus, which unfortunately led to layoffs.”

“In the beginning, Apple likely hired a lot of people from many disciplines as it was researching and playing around with what it should do in the automotive space,” Bajarin writes. “Knowing Apple as I do, I would not be surprised if it entertained everything from doing its own car to new ways to integrate its technology into existing vehicles.”

“My personal belief is that Project Titan is not about creating an Apple Car,” Bajarin writes. “It just does not make sense given the competition from traditional auto makers. Instead, the biggest opportunity I see for Apple is creating software that makes existing cars smart or autonomous.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: We think it’s about more than just software. Maybe not an entire vehicle, but there’s more than just software happening here.

I’ve always wanted to own and control the primary technology in everything we do. – Steve Jobs, October 12, 2004

[Apple’s] reason for being is the same as it’s always been — to make the world’s best products that really enrich people’s lives. That hasn’t changed. And we do that through owning the primary technologies. — Apple CEO Tim Cook, August 9, 2016