“The roll-out of Apple’s new mobile-operating system Wednesday was the first time the company used its proprietary data distribution infrastructure, also called a content-delivery network, for such a large-scale deployment,” Drew Fitzgerald reports for The Wall Street Journal.

“And it was a massive challenge at that. At one point, iOS 8 downloads chewed up more than 3 terabits of bandwidth each second, according to data from Internet researcher DeepField,” Fitzgerald reports. “‘It really was a significant coming out party for the Apple CDN,” DeepField Chief Executive Craig Labovitz said. ‘This is definitely a realization that Apple is not just a software player. They’re not just a maker of PCs. They have an Internet backbone and an international Internet presence.'”

“An in-house network involves heavy upfront costs but can save money in the long run,” Fitzgerald reports. “Apple’s network is the culmination of a lengthy effort to build a world-wide network that gives it more control over how its software and customer data traverse the Internet.”

Read more in the full article here.

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