Apple Pay now accepted in 50 percent of U.S. stores and is the world’s most accepted contactless payment system

“Speaking at NRF 2018 Retail’s Big Show in New York earlier this month, Apple Pay VP Jennifer Bailey presented a speech detailing how iPhone changed the retail landscape, and outlined the tech company’s ongoing efforts in the mobile payment marketplace,” AppleInsider reports.

“Purchases made on smartphones and tablets account for 25 percent of e-commerce transactions in the U.S. The rate of growth for mobile transactions is four times that of desktop, and 10 times that of traditional brick and mortar retail,” AppleInsider reports. “The same phenomenon is occurring outside the U.S. China, for example, sees 80 percent of its e-commerce transactions performed on mobile devices.”

“Apple Pay is behind a large chunk of those purchases. According to Bailey, Apple Pay availability was limited to about 3 percent of stores in the U.S. when it launched in 2014, but is now accepted in 50 percent of stores,” AppleInsider reports. “‘It’s the world’s most accepted contactless payment technology,’ Bailey said.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Slowly but surely.

SEE ALSO:
watchOS 4.2 delivers Apple Pay Cash to Apple Watch – December 5, 2017
Apple Pay now in 20 countries, takes 90% of all contactless payments where active – October 24, 2017
Apple Pay is proliferating, and the banks are scared – October 18, 2017
Apple Pay likely to get boost from Visa and Mastercard mandating contactless payment terminals – August 21, 2017
Apple Pay usage estimated to rise sharply in United States due to frustration with slow Chip-and-PIN cards – August 21, 2017

15 Comments

  1. Horray for Apple and its enthusiasts such as I but, on a political level, I am no enthusiast of moving away from paper currency as India and some of N. European countries such as Norway are doing; It’s a way for big gub’mnt to track our behavior (through the geographic location of our purchases) and our thoughts (through our magazine subscriptions) via our contactless payment process. Any gov. is thereby able to stalk your electronic MO and to physically oppress you more granularly.

    1. I don’t understand the CVS one. I thought they were getting it. I do my personal shopping and Rx at Walgreens, but for Rx for the kids they get sent to CVS and I have to deal with my twice-failing chip card. Such a pain…

  2. Apple Pay is great to use. But different stores have different requirements. Stores that accept Apple Pay immediately and automatically are sweet. One store I go to requires me to manually select either credit or debit (and maybe there is even an add cash option?) on their checkout device. Another store is immediate and automatic for small sales values, buy requires my signature on their checkout device for sales above a certain limit (maybe $20 ?). Another store requires me to sign all the time. Kinda crazy. It would be nice if they all just accepted my secure Apple iPhone fingerprint as my signature. (And also accepted my usual default preference for credit, not debit.)

    But Apple Pay is definitely amazing technology and is definitely growing. I am sure people behind me in line have noticed how quick & easy it is compared with dealing with cash or manually signing for credit cards.

    One last thing: it would be nice if Apple Pay would provide my itemized receipt — and not just the total — on my iPhone. Sometimes the itemized receipt comes in handy. When I use Apple Pay, I usually don’t ask for the paper receipt. But like I said, sometimes the itemized receipt may come in handy.

    All in all, I like Apple Pay and use it when I can. As mentioned, it is definitely growing. And I think retailers like it as much as consumers do.

  3. Two of my Bills Entergy (Electricity) and CenterPoint (Natural Gas) require an outfit called BillMatrix (subsidiary of Fiserv) to process online Debit or Credit Card payments. They charge $2.95 per transaction, which is complete Bullshit.

    Apple needs to disrupt this kind of financial scamming going on by getting Apple Pay in on paying utility bills.

Leave a Reply to Bryan Joseph Blumberg Cancel reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.