Apple: High Sierra will be last macOS release to support 32-bit apps ‘without compromise’

“We know that iOS 11 marks the end of the road for legacy 32-bit apps and now we’re learning about Apple’s new 64-bit requirement for Mac apps,” Christian Zibreg reports for iDownload Blog.

“In an advisory on Dev Center yesterday, the Cupertino giant announced that macOS High Sierra will be the last macOS release to support 32-bit apps ‘without compromise,'” Zibreg reports. “Apple originally said at the Worldwide Developers Conference that macOS apps submitted to Mac App Store must support 64-bit computing starting January 2018. The new advisory states that Mac app updates and existing apps must support 64-bit starting June 2018.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: June 2018 is more than generous for requiring 64-bit support.

Apple shipped the world’s first 64-bit personal computer over 14 years ago with the release of the Power Mac G5 on June 23, 2003. Apple unveiled the world’s first 64-bit smartphone (iPhone 5s) on September 10, 2013.

Apple’s notice:

64-bit Requirement for Mac Apps – June 28, 2017

At WWDC 2017, we announced new apps submitted to the Mac App Store must support 64-bit starting January 2018, and Mac app updates and existing apps must support 64-bit starting June 2018. If you distribute your apps outside the Mac App Store, we highly recommend distributing 64-bit binaries to make sure your users can continue to run your apps on future versions of macOS. macOS High Sierra will be the last macOS release to support 32-bit apps without compromise.

9 Comments

  1. I am expecting the next version of Mac OS beyond High Sierra to be a radical overhaul kind of like iOS7 was. High Sierra is the placeholder /bridge to flush the e2 bit apps out, get the new file system fully armored and all the rest.
    Not saying touch interface, but I expect the next past High Sierra to be as big a break as Windows 8 was from 7. 8 didn’t just change the UI, it stripped out tons of legacy cruft and has greatly improved the stability of Windows. Sinofsky & co took a lot of heat, but pulled a lot of crap out of Windows under the hood.

  2. I cannot wait. When trying to use many engineering and science packages that have to be compiled…I will inevitably get an incurable 32-bit/64-bit compatibility issues with the dynamic libraries. Just a big pain in the rear.

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