HandBrake: The party is way, way over

“The beta period is over,” Jeffrey Mincey writes for Mac360. “The great HandBrake 1.x, in development for a dozen years as a beta version, now is available to rip and burn DVD movies on your Mac. The most versatile and very geeky Mac utility converts almost any video source to MPEG-4 movies.”

“Guess what? The family’s oldest iMac– the last Mac model that came with a built-in SuperDrive, and the only Mac on the Mincey Plantation that has one– still holds the last DVD ejected from the SuperDrive from two years ago,” Mincey writes. “We haven’t burned a DVD or even used a DVD on a Mac for two years. Once HandBrake got the DVD movie collection to reside on the home media server, we’re DVD free. The last DVD player we bought was $35 from Best Buy. It’s been used. Once. To see if it would work. It did.”

Mincey writes, “If you don’t mind getting your geek on and you have a SuperDrive (or any recent or decent DVD player recorder) and the requisite DVD movie collection, you’ll like HandBrake 1.x… Now, if HandBrake could capture a Netflix stream, that would be something to write home about because, for all intents and purposes, the DVD party is over.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: What’s a DVD?

Blu-ray is just a bag of hurt. — Steve Jobs, October 2008

SEE ALSO:
HandBrake 1.0.0 released after 13 years in development – December 27, 2016

27 Comments

  1. Well, I guess me and my old iMac, 2008 vintage, just don’t fit in with the MDN world anymore.

    I’ll keep on using my iMac and Handbrake to rip kids DVDs for our iPads.

    1. Regarding Blu-ray: It’s cheap to use now!

      • Cheap players
      • Cheap writers
      • Cheap media

      But that hasn’t made it popular. I visited a Best Buy last month and stumped the floor walkers when I pointed to a shelf sign that said they sold Blu-ray writable media. They had no idea. They had NEVER seen it in the store. So sorry Sony.

      There have been at least TWO publicly announced successors to the Blu-ray standard. Neither of them became real. Dead end tech, apparently.

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