Higher income U.S. states use Apple iPhones; lower income states use Samsung Galaxy phones

“Apple announced earlier this year that it has officially reached the 1 billion active devices milestone, setting it apart from many of its competitors,” Dan Shaffer reports for WebpageFX. “WebpageFX monitors web traffic from over 1500 Google Analytics profiles. This allows us to dig into datasets like service provider market share and even mobile device market share. Since the beginning of 2016, we’ve compiled nearly 30 million users and the mobile devices they used to access the websites we monitor.”

“Apple iPhones and Samsung Galaxies made up nearly two-thirds of the 30 million mobile device users we analyzed,” Shaffer reports. “What we found was that the iPhone took the largest piece of the market not only this year so far, but also the last two years we analyzed.

Shaffer reports, “The Samsung Galaxy line of phones, the second largest brand of smartphone in our dataset, came in just below 20% of the market share for 2016, and even less the two years before.”

Apple iPhone vs. Samsung Galaxy Market Share
Apple iPhone vs. Samsung Galaxy Market Share

Shaffer reports, “However, this data isn’t quite consistent across every region of the United States. In fact, each state reflects a slightly different story. The map below shows the iPhone market share of each state.”

2016 iPhone Market Share in the United States

The poorer states tended to have a higher Samsung Galaxy market share and the wealthier states have a higher iPhone market share. In correlation to each states’ mean income reported from the 2015 census data, we found that there is a positive correlation between iPhone market share and higher income states,” Shaffer reports. “The exact opposite happens with Galaxy smartphones… the higher income states tend to use Samsung Galaxies less, while low-income states use them more.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Real iPhones vs. Poor Man’s iPhones. Same as it ever was.

“All men are created equal.”

Well, not when it comes to users of smartphones and tablets…

The bottom line: Those who settle for Android devices are not equal to iOS users. The fact is that iOS users are worth significantly more than Android settlers to developers, advertisers, third-party accessory makers (speakers, cases, chargers, cables, etc.), vehicle makers, musicians, TV show producers, movie producers, book authors, carriers, retailers, podcasters… The list goes on and on.

The quality of the customer matters. A lot.

Facile “analyses” that look only at market (unit) share, equating one Android settler to one iOS user, make a fatal error by incorrectly equating users of each platform one-to-one.

When it comes to mobile operating systems, all users are simply not equal.SteveJack, MacDailyNews, November 15, 2014

Android is pushed to users who are, in general:

a) confused about why they should be choosing an iPhone over an inferior knockoff and therefore might be less prone to understand/explore their devices’ capabilities or trust their devices with credit card info for shopping; and/or
b) enticed with “Buy One Get One Free,” “Buy One, Get Two or More Free,” or similar ($100 Gift Cards with Purchase) offers.

Neither type of customer is the cream of the crop when it comes to successful engagement or coveted demographics; closer to the bottom of the barrel than the top, in fact. Android can be widespread and still demographically inferior precisely because of the way in which and to whom Android devices are marketed. Unending BOGO promos attract a seemingly unending stream of cheapskate freetards just as inane, pointless TV commercials about robots or blasting holes in concrete walls attract meatheads and dullards, not exactly the best demographics unless you’re peddling muscle building powders or grease monkey overalls.

Google made a crucial mistake: They gave away Android to “partners” who pushed and continue to push the product into the hands of the exact opposite type of user that Google needs for Android to truly thrive. Hence, Android is a backwater of second-rate, or worse, app versions that are only downloaded when free or ad-supported – but the Android user is notoriously cheap, so the ads don’t sell for much because they don’t work very well. You’d have guessed that Google would have understood this, but you’d have guessed wrong.

Google built a platform that depends heavily on advertising support, but sold it to the very type of customer who’s the least likely to patronize ads.

iOS users are the ones who buy apps, so developers focus on iOS users. iOS users buy products, so accessory makers focus on iOS users. iOS users have money and the proven will to spend it, so vehicle makers focus on iOS users. Etcetera. Android can have the Hee Haw demographic. Apple doesn’t want it or need it; it’s far more trouble than it’s worth.MacDailyNews, November 26, 2012

SEE ALSO:
iOS users are worth 10X more than those who settle for Android – July 27, 2016
Apple’s App Store revenue nearly double that of Google’s Android – April 20, 2016
Poor man’s iPhone: Android on the decline – February 26, 2015
Study: iPhone users are smarter and richer than those who settle for Android phones – January 22, 2015
Why Android users can’t have the nicest things – January 5, 2015
iPhone users earn significantly more than those who settle for Android phones – October 8, 2014
Yet more proof that Android is for poor people – June 27, 2014
More proof that Android is for poor people – May 13, 2014
Android users poorer, shorter, unhealthier, less educated, far less charitable than Apple iPhone users – November 13, 2013
IDC data shows two thirds of Android’s 81% smartphone share are cheap junk phones – November 13, 2013
CIRP: Apple iPhone users are younger, richer, and better educated than those who settle for Samsung knockoff phones – August 19, 2013
iPhone users smarter, richer than Android phone users – August 16, 2011
Study: Apple iPhone users richer, younger, more productive than other so-called ‘smartphone’ users – June 12, 2009

30 Comments

      1. lol…. come on… you should know better than that.. or you should pay a bit more attention.
        samdung is for the ignorant poor.. Apple is for the educated elite..etc..etc etc…
        this kind stuff actually creates a negative vibe for the Apple brand!.

        Apple is for everybody.. not just the rich.
        and among my friends.. there are wealthy people who prefer android and samsung or others… and there are people with not such high incomes and they love and own Apple.

        Stereotyping Apple as the brand for the elite is a huge mistake !
        warning people that samdungs explode is a responsible thing to do tough!

      2. You CANNOT judge a whole state based upon income for that state. Look at CA as a prime example. CA has some extremely wealthy people, and the LARGEST population BELOW the poverty line too!

        In my state, there are VERY poor areas… but where I live we make BMWs, jet fighters, gas & wind power turbines, and soon Mercedes… in another part of our state we manufacture Boeing passenger jets, and soon Volvos.

        Many other states are exactly the same. For a microcosm, look at NYC, then independently look at the 5 boroughs… and you get an entirely different picture.

    1. Some always have been. I don’t know about you, but I’m really tired of everything that divides us, no matter how ridiculous it is. That’s led us to the worst excrement of the two party system competing not for clown of the century, but President of the United States.

  1. Seriously, I’m so sick of this class-warfare cheap-shot by MDN. Apple products are great. They provide great value for the price. Those who use Apple products spend less time and money in the long run that those who go for cheap alternatives. The benefit of Apple products is agnostic to the income of the individual.

    Many of those android settlers are future iPhone converts. I welcome them all.

  2. I would not say that this is class warfare by looking at the chart. Louisiana and Mississippi are among the “poorest” states in the union, have been for some time, but they are in the highest brackets for iPhone market share. I work with generational poverty people. They will do without a lot of things to get what they want, and iPhones are one thing that they want.

  3. Not really a surprising finding. It’s the same trend internationally. iPhone is an aspirational product, therefore the higher earning places are more likely to have more of them. Meanwhile Android is pretty ubiquitous, and obviously well liked, but not really the sought after product.

  4. Seems to me that the price differential cannot explain this, despite MDN’s strange support of the “poor man’s iPhone” line. The prices are very similar.
    I’d be interested in seeing a comparison of how “informed” people are (ability to see through marketing bullshit, being educated, etc.) and how that tracks with buying Samsung over Apple.
    My suspicion is that there are higher concentrations of people who buy into marketed nonsense in certain places than there are in others. In other words, people who make decisions based not on what’s _actually_ best for them, but what someone has fooled them into thinking is best.
    Extrapolate that into other realms of discourse as you will. 😉

      1. Yes. There probably are people in that category. That’s required by what I said, since I said “higher concentration” of uninformed people. I did not say “exclusively uninformed.”
        So, that isn’t really responsive to my suspicion that a slightly-higher percentage of people making uninformed choices might result in a higher concentration of purchasing Samsung phones.
        If I say “this thing might trend more, on average, towards X than towards Y,” pointing out that there are some Y is not a rebuttal.

        1. Interesting analog. My point does move in the direction you indicate, but was not intended to indicate a minority. As there are people, there are as many choices that may have been considered when choosing the ‘right’ phone for them. There could just as well be a large percentage of iPhone users that have never considered other alternatives and ‘fooled’ in their own way by the marketing to buy an iPhone. My point is that based on articles like this one there is no reason to think that because an iPhone was purchased that it was a more informed choice for what was ‘right’ for them.

  5. I mean, I really enjoy having my SD card. Or shopping for books on audible through the app. There are things that Android does so much better. I like iOS but truelly, it is kept limited by its development. I have the note 7 which I believe is very expensive more so than most of the iPhone line up, so it’s not about money. .. I’ll say this though, if iPhone plus had a stylus, I’d pick it up in a heart beat.

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