Samsung may be forced to recall Galaxy Note 7 over exploding batteries

“The hold on Samsung Galaxy Note 7 shipments because of quality issues that began on Wednesday may escalate to a wider consumer recall for the device, according to reports out of South Korea,” Mike Wuerthele reports for AppleInsider. “According to the Korea Herald, stories of bursting batteries have escalated in recent days. As a result, Samsung is said to be considering a wide-scale battery replacement program for the phone.”

“While Samsung produces the phone’s individual lithium-ion battery cells, the complete battery assembly is manufactured by others. The flaw appears to be related to manufacturer ITM Semiconductor, the producer of nearly all of the Galaxy Note 7 batteries for the South Korean market,” Wuerthele reports. “AppleInsider has learned that some of the models shipped to the U.S. have the potentially problematic ITM Semiconductor battery installed — the same model as found in all of the bursting phones in Korea.”

Wuerthele reports, “Wednesday’s shipment delay came in response to a flurry of posts on Korean social media showing destroyed phones.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Aw, gee, that’s too bad.

If it’s not an iPhone, it’s an incendiary device for your pocket cobbled together by a South Korean dishwasher maker.

Thermonuclear
Thermonuclear.

SEE ALSO:
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26 Comments

  1. A great company takes ownership of something wrong. A bad company ignores and blames customers.

    1. Bendgate
    2. Antennagate
    3. Exploding iPhones
    4. LightLeaks
    5. Touch Disease

    LOL

    Hint… the company name can be seen in issues above!

    APPLE!!!!!

    1. Yes. Let he who is without sin cast the first stone. The recall is official now and is a PR disaster for Samsung. The incidence rate is reported at 24 per 1 million phones. At least Samsung acknowledged the problem with remarkable speed for a mega corporation and acted swiftly – and acted against their own interests before someone got hurt.
      I have a feeling Apple would say “you’re charging it wrong.”

      1. Actually, that’s not the incident rate. You don’t issue a recall unless the rma rate is above 1-3%, the fact that 24-41 have been reported, doesn’t mean that’s how many are affected. Made up stuff about iPhones (every generation I might add) that weren’t real problems, is not the same thing as a widespread issue requiring a recall. If this was just 24-41 devices, and there wasn’t a systemic, obviously provable manufacturing issue which affects 2.5 million devices being recalled? Samsung would simply replace the affected units with unaffected current stock. Get you facts straight, and learn how business works before making idioting comments on a board with people much smarter than you.

    2. Ok, you’re a troll but I’m going to feed you anyway:

      Atennagate: not a real thing, the signal strength algorithm was incorrect and Steve jobs himself admitted that and it was fixed. Secondly, people were holding it wrong… In order to get the iPhone 4 prior to algorithm adjustment to even do it, you had to wedge the thing into your palm and cover up all 3 ateanna bands. But blown completely out of proportion, and didn’t necessitate a recall.

      Light leaks: not a real thing. Affected ~31 devices, and anyone who was concerned about it got a new phone for free. But nothing had to be remanufactured or recalled, because again, not a real thing.

      Bend gate: not a real thing. A guy makes a video on YouTube deliberately applying too much force to the product, an amount of force by the way, which bent every other phone released that year including the Galaxy s5. Apple used much stronger aluminum in the 6s just to eliminate people even trying it this time. But it wasn’t a real thing, again no recall necessary.

      Exploding phones: 2 iPhone 4’s in China caught fire because they were using unlicensed cheap chargers! Using real chargers doesn’t cause that problem.

      Touch disease: not a real thing. Yes, many repair shops say they’ve seen it, but the Apple Store replaces the unit for free, and it is not something that people can reproduce effectively enough to cause a big kerfuffle. So? Not a thing.

      Every iPhone supposedly has some massive problem, except they don’t, and since they’re made up “scandals” they die pretty quickly now since our customer base is so much bigger. This isn’t like the old days when a zombie Apple lie wouldn’t die.

  2. Let’s not be too hasty. Apple replaced my wife’s iPhone 6 for just such an “exploding battery” problem. Luckily, it’s not widespread for iPhones, but neither Apple nor Samsung produce the batteries that go into their phones – they’re provided by a third party.

    Apple obviously has a better supply chain management system, which is entirely the doing of Tim Cook in his pre-CEO days. While there are many issues on which I disagree with Cook as CEO (bringing his personal social priorities into the CEO’s office being the main one), I cannot deny his contributions to Apple, and this is just one of them.

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