Jennifer Lawrence calls nude photo hacking a ‘sex crime’

‘I was just so afraid. I didn’t know how this would affect my career.’That’s just the beginning of what Jennifer Lawrence has to say about her stolen-photos saga in the cover story of Vanity Fair’s November issue, the digital edition of which will be available Wednesday, October 8, and which hits newsstands in New York and Los Angeles on Thursday, October 9,” Vanity Fair reports.

“‘Just because I’m a public figure, just because I’m an actress, does not mean that I asked for this,’ she says. ‘It does not mean that it comes with the territory. It’s my body, and it should be my choice, and the fact that it is not my choice is absolutely disgusting. I can’t believe that we even live in that kind of world,'” Vanity Fair reports. “She had been tempted to write a statement when news of the privacy violation broke, she says, but ‘every single thing that I tried to write made me cry or get angry. I started to write an apology, but I don’t have anything to say I’m sorry for. I was in a loving, healthy, great relationship for four years. It was long distance, and either your boyfriend is going to look at porn or he’s going to look at you.'”

Photograph by Patrick Demarchelier. Styled by Jessica Diehl.
Photograph by Patrick Demarchelier. Styled by Jessica Diehl.
“Lawrence also addresses the legal ramifications of the hack. ‘It is not a scandal. It is a sex crime,'” Vanity Fair reports. “Lawrence continued, ‘It is a sexual violation. It’s disgusting. The law needs to be changed, and we need to change. That’s why these Web sites are responsible. Just the fact that somebody can be sexually exploited and violated, and the first thought that crosses somebody’s mind is to make a profit from it. It’s so beyond me. I just can’t imagine being that detached from humanity. I can’t imagine being that thoughtless and careless and so empty inside.'”

Vanity Fair reports, “In the cover story, the Hunger Games star vents her frustration not just with the offending hackers but also with those—including people she knows—who viewed the images online. ‘Anybody who looked at those pictures, you’re perpetuating a sexual offense. You should cower with shame. Even people who I know and love say, ‘Oh, yeah, I looked at the pictures.’ I don’t want to get mad, but at the same time I’m thinking, I didn’t tell you that you could look at my naked body.'”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Note: Once again: Too many people use one password for multiple services and weak passwords at that. Once hackers guess that password, they then have access to all sorts of things: cloud storage, bank accounts, Facebook, Twitter, email, etc.

Regardless of the origination of these photos and videos, social engineering hacks can be thwarted, at least for iCloud. Use two-step verification for Apple ID to keep your personal information as secure as possible. More info here.

Always use unique passwords and use Apple’s Keychain Access and iCloud Keychain to create and manage them. When used properly, it works like a dream.

Related articles:
Apple’s iCloud security nightmare gets worse as more nude celebrity pics leak – September 21, 2014
Since the celebrity nude iCloud hacks, one third of Americans have improved their online security – September 8, 2014
Apple denies iCloud breach – September 3, 2014
How easy is it to crack into an Apple iCloud account? We tried to find out – September 3, 2014
Celeb nudes: Comprehensive review of forum posts reveals no mention of ‘Find My iPhone’ brute force technique – September 2, 2014
Apple’s iCloud is secure; weak passwords and gullible users are not – September 2, 2014
Apple: No iCloud breach in celebrity nude photos leak – September 2, 2014
FBI, Apple investigating alleged iCloud hack of celebrity nude, sex photos and videos – September 2, 2014
Celebrity or not, Apple isn’t responsible for your nude photos – September 2, 2014
Apple ‘actively investigating’ Jennifer Lawrence, other nude celebrity photos hack – September 1, 2014
Apple’s iCloud not likely the sole source of leaked Jennifer Lawrence, other nude celebrity photos and videos – September 1, 2014

79 Comments

  1. Things done in the dark do come to the light. That’s a Biblical principle.
    Were those pictures selfies? So as earlier stated, the photographer probably saw her and possesses a digital cop, himself.
    Crazy Foams!

  2. She used a weak password. She had an expectation of privacy when she stored her photos on line. She’s still the victim and the person who broke into her account is still a thief.

  3. Disagree with all the “don’t take nude pics” posts. That’s too close to the “if you didn’t want to be raped don’t wear that type of dress” idea. If she wants to take nude pics why shouldn’t she. I also disagree with her, it’s not a “sex-crime”. It’s an invasion of privacy and if she’s posting things online she has to take more precautions. It’s this thing called the internet…it’s on computers now.

    1. To inform a victim on how to protect themselves does not mean you don’t respect their situation, it’s just saying there are creeps out there and you’re going to have to grow up and be very careful because they’re just waiting.

      1. It’s weird, isn’t it? Here we have advice being given to one person about to operate (more) safely in an environment that is full of other people… other people who do not give one iota of care about what that one person’s situation is. The person who commits rape is looking for that something which sets one potential target apart from the others. I doubt it has much to do with anything other than appearance, availability and vulnerability. We can all stand on the streets with signs telling the rapist to go away or we can stand on the streets with signs informing potential targets about the risk their choices are creating for them. I guess we should do both, but giving advice to someone who commits rape is probably less successful than giving advice to someone who is otherwise balanced and not suffering from whatever drives someone to commit crimes against others.

    2. I’m not sure whether or not this is a sex crime. Seems to be a lot of armchair lawyers on MDN voicing their opinion. Minors sending nude photos of themselves to others (sexting) has been prosecuted in some jurisdictions. I’d be interested in hearing the opinion of a legal expert on her assertion.

  4. Wow, so many people on her are blaming her. SHE IS A VICTIM. While I don’t think it’s a sex crime, the fact is that her personal private information was stolen. Just because she “had a weak password” doesn’t make the crime okay.

    That would be like saying “hey, the bank had weak security so it’s okay for me to rob it”.

    She is a human being. Her privacy was violated. There is literally no different between this happening to her and this happening to one of your mother’s, or sisters, or girlfriends.

    1. No, its not blaming her. This time. She should now be made aware that there is no way for anyone to protect her when tossing stuff out on the Internet. It’s up to her. She has to take charge of her own safety. Does that mean it’s her “Fault?” No. But if her risky behavior continues and it happens again, I’ll have less sympathy.

      I mean Ben, if I put the key to my house under the welcome mat and someone goes in and helps themselves, is that my fault? Would you be wrong for telling me not to do that anymore? And if I did it again and it happened again, would you then consider me to be at least partially at fault?

      1. Thelonious Mac I respectfully disagree with your point.

        If you left the key to your house under your mat and someone broke into your home using that very key, I would still maintain you did nothing wrong. I would say it’s not your fault. Could you have been more secure? Sure, but that still doesn’t put ANY fault of that crime onto you.

        For that matter, if you left your front door wide open and someone went into your home and stole something, I still would not say it’s your fault. Again, you could have been more secure, but the fault is not yours.

        People are supposed to have morals. The bible (among other books say) “Thou Shalt Not Steal”. That is a direction for the person, not a direction for the victim. Even if your front door is open, the person that is breaking “Thou Shalt Not Steal” is in the wrong because they are not exercising morals. They are violating your privacy instead of respecting it.

        Many of the comments I was replying to initially simply say “you shouldn’t have taken nude photos” or “you should have had a better password”. The fact is, she should have been more secure. I have not disagreed with a single comment that simply said “be careful where you put your content”. I have however disagreed with those that said “you shouldn’t have created that content”.

        I am free to leave my key to my house under my mat. It does not give any person in the world the right to use that key to violate my home.

        Your key example to me would be like you saying “you did not get your mail out of your mailbox within moments of it being delivered and someone took it and used your new credit card to steal your identity, so it’s your fault”. When in reality, it would be “have sensitive mail delivered to a more secure place, but you are still within your rights to have sensitive mail delivered to you”.

    1. That response is misplacing the blame.

      I suppose you feel Tracy Morgan is at fault for all of his injuries because he wasn’t wearing a seat belt even though a semi truck driver feel asleep at the wheel and slammed into his car.

      It’s not the truck drivers fault, it’s the victims fault. If he was wearing his seat belt he may not have gotten hurt.

      I hope you never in your life get intimate pictures from someone you love, and if you do, I hope they are leaked online to prove how stupid your loved one is by the way you judge the situation.

  5. There is no doubt in my mind that Jennifer Lawrence has been the equivalent of raped with a massive audience.

    She has been assaulted without the obligative high hard one.

    She has been humiliated in front of the whole world.

    Blaming her lack of a strong password as a ticket to further humiliate her, over and over again, is just not right.

    The son of a bitch who stole and exposed her intimate photos should be drawn and quartered.

  6. I am saddened and disgusted by the responses above. I am a very hetro male, but I feel ashamed that any woman should have to suffer such violation, even a celebrity. The responses above are from the perspective of a male. Perhaps more than a few of you looked at the photos, which I for one refuse to do.

    The “she looked sexy, so she had it coming” meme is total BS. Perhaps you think that women should only be seen in public wearing a burka and completely covering their face? If you buy into this, consider yourself to be a misogynist, sexist asshat.

    Instead, put yourself into the position of the victim. If you found a compromising photo of yourself circulating on the Web, such as one of you passed out drunk at a college frat party, would you not feel violated? Perhaps in that perspective you might understand how a Jennifer Lawrence might feel. Being a celebrity does not make her invulnerable to having emotions like you and me.

    What disturbs me is that the basement-dwelling creeps who started all this are getting a free pass. The punditocracy and media are instead pointing blame on companies like Apple. Yes, we can hide behind the notion that it’s the celebrities’ fault for not following stronger security procedures. But truth be told, their doors were locked (perhaps not bolted shut), and some very pathetic losers broke in, stole their possessions, and ransacked their lives. Yet, they are being labeled as heroes in their dark little corner of the Internet. And none of you are the slightest bit upset about what they did.

    Until it happens to you, that is.

    Get your heads out of the gutter. Try to be classy. You are better than this.

    1. For me this all boils down to; Does the Internet user have any responsibility for their own safety? If we find that their knowledge of risky behavior on the Internet is lacking, should we inform them or keep quiet out of some desire to be politically correct?

      I’d rather say to Ms. Lawrence, look, you were wronged, it should not have happened, but these are the risks of the Internet. Here is some guidance on how you can protect yourself. I.e. empower yourself against the creeps who do this. Your assertion that this is a sex crime however is way off kilter. It is theft, nothing more.

      So when you go back out there, be aware that no one is looking out for you, no one is going to protect you, no one really cares. So YOU have to.

      Same thing I’d tell my child if I had one. Same thing I tell clients. Why some of you think this woman is so special I don’t know, because she’s not.

      1. I mostly agree with this comment. However, the gray area I guess is the word “internet”. I guess people think of the internet as different things. Here’s one thing, Jennifer NEVER EVER used the internet to transmit these pictures, store these pictures, or do ANYTHING with these pictures. The internet only came into play by the people that stole them.

        Is the “internet” and “cloud” the same thing? Because these photos were backed up on iCloud, a server that is not accessible via any public protocols. The answer is probably yes.

        I guess to reiterate your point I would say when using anything that stores or backs up to any location that is not directly in your home, consider it the internet. iCloud is on the internet. DropBox is on the internet. Those Android backup services are on the internet. They are all susceptible to people breaking in to them.

        Essentially teach people the scope of the internet is not simply email and web browsers.

        1. Rule of thumb:
          If it is not 100% in your possession, you are NOT in control of it.

          The second you post/send/upload/store/etc across the internet… you lose ALL control. there is no worldwide delete.

  7. If the prospect of having her nude pictures leaked was so unbelievably horrifying, then why did she upload them to an account with an easily guessed password? Shouldn’t she have been a little more concerned?

    She should just be honest and fess up to making a mistake. “Welp, I took nude pics and put them behind a crappy password. Now they’re all over the internet because that’s how the internet works. D’oh.”

    But then again, acting righteously indignant and cranking the victimhood up to 11 lands her on the cover of Vanity Fair(in a sexy topless photo, which is exactly the kind of pic you want to be in during a nude photo scandal), so…

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