Jennifer Lawrence calls nude photo hacking a ‘sex crime’

‘I was just so afraid. I didn’t know how this would affect my career.’That’s just the beginning of what Jennifer Lawrence has to say about her stolen-photos saga in the cover story of Vanity Fair’s November issue, the digital edition of which will be available Wednesday, October 8, and which hits newsstands in New York and Los Angeles on Thursday, October 9,” Vanity Fair reports.

“‘Just because I’m a public figure, just because I’m an actress, does not mean that I asked for this,’ she says. ‘It does not mean that it comes with the territory. It’s my body, and it should be my choice, and the fact that it is not my choice is absolutely disgusting. I can’t believe that we even live in that kind of world,'” Vanity Fair reports. “She had been tempted to write a statement when news of the privacy violation broke, she says, but ‘every single thing that I tried to write made me cry or get angry. I started to write an apology, but I don’t have anything to say I’m sorry for. I was in a loving, healthy, great relationship for four years. It was long distance, and either your boyfriend is going to look at porn or he’s going to look at you.'”

Photograph by Patrick Demarchelier. Styled by Jessica Diehl.
Photograph by Patrick Demarchelier. Styled by Jessica Diehl.
“Lawrence also addresses the legal ramifications of the hack. ‘It is not a scandal. It is a sex crime,'” Vanity Fair reports. “Lawrence continued, ‘It is a sexual violation. It’s disgusting. The law needs to be changed, and we need to change. That’s why these Web sites are responsible. Just the fact that somebody can be sexually exploited and violated, and the first thought that crosses somebody’s mind is to make a profit from it. It’s so beyond me. I just can’t imagine being that detached from humanity. I can’t imagine being that thoughtless and careless and so empty inside.'”

Vanity Fair reports, “In the cover story, the Hunger Games star vents her frustration not just with the offending hackers but also with those—including people she knows—who viewed the images online. ‘Anybody who looked at those pictures, you’re perpetuating a sexual offense. You should cower with shame. Even people who I know and love say, ‘Oh, yeah, I looked at the pictures.’ I don’t want to get mad, but at the same time I’m thinking, I didn’t tell you that you could look at my naked body.'”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Note: Once again: Too many people use one password for multiple services and weak passwords at that. Once hackers guess that password, they then have access to all sorts of things: cloud storage, bank accounts, Facebook, Twitter, email, etc.

Regardless of the origination of these photos and videos, social engineering hacks can be thwarted, at least for iCloud. Use two-step verification for Apple ID to keep your personal information as secure as possible. More info here.

Always use unique passwords and use Apple’s Keychain Access and iCloud Keychain to create and manage them. When used properly, it works like a dream.

Related articles:
Apple’s iCloud security nightmare gets worse as more nude celebrity pics leak – September 21, 2014
Since the celebrity nude iCloud hacks, one third of Americans have improved their online security – September 8, 2014
Apple denies iCloud breach – September 3, 2014
How easy is it to crack into an Apple iCloud account? We tried to find out – September 3, 2014
Celeb nudes: Comprehensive review of forum posts reveals no mention of ‘Find My iPhone’ brute force technique – September 2, 2014
Apple’s iCloud is secure; weak passwords and gullible users are not – September 2, 2014
Apple: No iCloud breach in celebrity nude photos leak – September 2, 2014
FBI, Apple investigating alleged iCloud hack of celebrity nude, sex photos and videos – September 2, 2014
Celebrity or not, Apple isn’t responsible for your nude photos – September 2, 2014
Apple ‘actively investigating’ Jennifer Lawrence, other nude celebrity photos hack – September 1, 2014
Apple’s iCloud not likely the sole source of leaked Jennifer Lawrence, other nude celebrity photos and videos – September 1, 2014

79 Comments

  1. What a naive idiot. It continues to amaze me of the stupidity of these celebrities. Maybe Apple should include a note with every I purchase for celebrities: Do not enable iCloud. Or better yet, just buy a camcorder for your ‘home’ movies.

    1. Intelligent isn’t necessarily part of the job description for being a celebrity. This “hack” wasn’t a sex crime, it was a stupidity crime. People too stupid to use strong passwords deserve what they get.

    1. That is a very moronic statement. That is exactly the like telling a girl “if you didn’t want to get raped you shouldn’t have worn that bikini to the beach”, or like telling a bank “if you didn’t want to get robbed you shouldn’t have kept so much money in your vault”. She and other celebrities are victims of a crime. I wouldn’t call it a sex crime, but it’s definitely an invasion of privacy.

      The better way to respond in a fashion like that would be like what Matt said below about the lesson being if you are keeping information in digital form (intellectual or personal private photos) be careful about allowing them to be stored on computers and servers not under your control.

      There is noting wrong with taking personal photos to share with your loved one. Just be careful where you store your digital data. Make sure it’s in your control.

      This would be completely different scenario if her ex had released the photos. At that point it’s not a crime (well, in about 45 states it’s not a crime), it would just be a douchebag ex looking for revenge.

      1. It’s not the same. Macinfo expressed it poorly, but there is nothing wrong with telling people about the dangers they face when they exercise their rights.

        I feel that women have an implicit right to feel safe walking down the street no matter what they wear, for instance, but in practicality, there’s lots of crazies out there! People should be made aware of the dangers. Just be aware. If teaching someone how to increase their safety is also political incorrect (which it often is) we have a problem.

        This does not say it is her fault, but it does say that in the future, know that there is no way to completely protect you from this sort of activity. You have to be proactive about your security.

        Computers and the Internet that now connects them all constitute an extremely complex world that every user should know at least something about, with regard to security. If I say to Ms. Lawrence, “Yes you were wronged, but you should know you have some responsibilities here also,” that is not saying she is at fault, that is saying this is how YOU can help to prevent it from happening in the future.

        Why is it that it is ok to warn people about risky behavior in certain circumstances (smoking, riding a motorcycle without a helmet) but in others (dressing provocatively, going to a crappy little bar on the seedy side of town, alone and getting drunk) its considered not ok?

        1. It is possible Macinfo was expressing a point poorly, or expressing a poor point clearly. It looks like the latter to me.

          Its ok to warn women of the dangers of dressing provocatively, going somewhere sketchy and getting drunk. It is not ok to tell women “never dress provocatively, go somewhere sketchy and get drunk”.

          Life is short, the risk of death is 100%. Everything good comes with some risk. Pushing boundaries at times is as important for quality of life as taking precautions.

        2. Don’t be a victim-blaming asshole. Timing is everything.
          To use your analogy, if you lean over the bicyclist lying on the side of the road with a serious head injury and tell him/her: “You should have worn a helmet,” you’re an asshole.
          Or, you see someone with emphysema and say “you’re dumb for smoking cigarettes” (ignoring whatever stress/abuse/whatever in their life may have led to that), you’re an asshole.

          Same goes here. People who focus on what victims could have done to build impenetrable fortresses of solitude instead of talking about criminals/abusers are assholes.

        3. Telling a woman not to take nude pictures is placing the blame squarely on her. My anology does work perfectly.

          In your analogy you are saying if you walk down the street without a concealed weapon or some other way to defend yourself then you had better not be carrying your wallet or any valuables with you since you can not be proactive about your security? If you get mugged at gun point it’s your fault for not being proactive about your security?

          Macinfo may have been trying to make a different point, but the words he used to express them placed the blame on the victim.

          So, what is the opinion about the person or persons that hacked into the account, stole the pictures, and distributed them online? What portion of the blame do they get for this?

  2. The larger lesson is if you make data available in digital form, it can be taken without consent. Sometimes it’s intellectual property, other times it’s account information, and others it’s private photos.

  3. It’s not a sex crime.

    Nudity is not criminal, at least not yet.

    I think these incidents need to be considered property crimes, and treated as misuse of stolen property, since data (photo) was stolen and used without the owner’s permission.

    1. I agree. Most (if not all) states have laws against selling or profiting from stolen property. So the people trading these pictures in the underground as well as the people hacking these services to get them are breaking laws. But they are not sex crimes. Should they be? That’s an interesting question that should be debated. It will be an interesting debate.

  4. Let’s review:

    Take naked pics
    Put them online, but behind a weak password
    Weak password is found
    Pictures are released

    And you call it a sex crime?
    So you say there is no difference between you, and a rape victim?

    Entitlement mentality.

    1. There’re some useful things for good living called Christian Principles. If you stare at your brother’s woman with lust in your heart, you have committed adultery in your heart and mind. From thought to action there’s just one step. I’m on Jenny’s side. You shouldn’t break into someone else’s room just because the door is not locked good, and then avoid your responsibility blaming your victim for not locking her door good. Shess! Where are the heroes and gentlemen gone?

      1. No-one (at least, no-one I’ve read here) is suggesting this was not a crime. The debate seems to be whether the theft of digital photographs, some of which show naked people, is a sex crime (as opposed to some other sort of crime, such as invasion of privacy or theft of property). Most definitions of sex crimes I can find all refer to acts that have a physical aspect, with the exception of child pornography. It seems settled that child pornography is a special category of crime, that by definition doesn’t include photographs of adults.
        Christian principals have nothing to do with this. It’s about legal issues.

      2. I just used the same example. If I leave a key to my house under the mat and someone waltzes in and takes my things, am I not at least partially at fault. My behavior was risky. Perhaps you will excuse me this time for being naive?

        Wouldn’t you also be good enough to tell me why my behavior is risky? Or would you leave me ignorant as to the ways of the world? Would you just keep it to yourself because my feelings might get hurt?

        And if you told me that out there in the real world there be thieves who look for easy ways to break into houses, and I still put my key under the mat, and it happened again, wouldn’t you feel less sympathy for me?

        The way I see it is that people are so conditioned by years of certain types of rhetoric, the the mere idea that we have any personal responsibility at all in our own safety and security is foreign to them.

        1. Hi, nice guy!!
          Granted. But, look, more than two thirds of people commenting here blame the victim and make fun of her and take advantage of her naive and gullible security measures. Just ask them: Have you seen Jenny’s pics? Yes. Did you enjoy them? Yes. Did you get horny? Yes. Then, you’re taking your share in the loot. That is not right. Anyway, most of these guys are mediocre and mentally crippled losers, unable to get the real thing whereas hoping to touch heaven with a stupid photo.

          1. I actually haven’t seen *any* of the leaked photos, don’t care to waste time looking for them.
            If I wanted to see most of them naked.. I’d watch their movies lol.

            Someone else mentioned the point that eludes you.. This dipshit is putting herself on the same level as an actual victim of a sex crime (like rape etc)

            I don’t care if it was a “celebrity” or my neighbor, when you do stupid shit… You are not entitled to any different treatment. She wants to be treated different JUST cause she was in a movie.

            1. She doesn’t want to be treated different JUST because she’s a movie star. She wishes laws were improved to punish privacy invasion on internet. Doesn’t she have the right to wish a little, just because she’s a movie star? How’s the one trying to impose a different treatment here?

            2. For starters.
              “Just the fact that somebody can be sexually exploited and violated”

              SHE TOOK THE PICTURES, and she wants it to be a crime because she’s stupid.
              She wants tougher laws, IE the Government to step in, JUST because she can’t take ANY responsibility for her ignorance.

              “I was in a loving, healthy, great relationship for four years. It was long distance, and either your boyfriend is going to look at porn or he’s going to look at you.”

              if he’s looking at porn, shouldn’t that tell you something…..

            3. Just a little reading.
              http://host.jibc.ca/seytoolkit/what.htm
              Looked up “Sexual exploration” just cause little miss entitlement thinks she was.
              (this may not be the best site to find the answer.. but trust me the search results were not “safe” lol)

              Bottom line, she gave consent to have the pics taken.. (She took them) “Sex Crime” can’t be used. now like someone else mentioned, PROPERTY Crime.. now we might be getting somewhere.
              Blackmail.. again a possibility.
              Sex Crime? not even close.

            4. On that we agree. There should be strong penalties against computer hackers who steal the digital private property of anyone. This is a theft and a violation no different then if someone broke into her home and robbed it. But she was not physically harmed by this incident, and as a matter of fact when she goes in the pages of Vanity Fair to call this a sex crime, she is putting more publicity on the sulatious and giving the hackers more incentive to do the same. I would say since similar tactics have been used to hack government agencies lets make computer hacking a federal crime with a 10 year Federal Prison sentence. Lets really put a deterrent to such crimes.

    1. If you ever get carjacked it’s going to be your fault for driving such a nice car. If you ever get your home broken into, it’s because you were stupid enough to have a home in the first place. Bottom line, it will be your fault. So don’t you dare try to blame the person that stole your stuff or press charges against anyone.

      1. That she was the victim of a computer hacker. Yes. That there should be strong penalties for such crimes. Without a doubt. But when Ms. Lawrence suggests this is a sex crime. No. This comes nowhere close to the countless victims is sexual assault. Real sex crimes. Whereas she had my sympathy, since I am the victim of computer hacks and btw I have been assaulted in a robbery having been pistol whipped. Now she is coming across as an entitled celebrity.

  5. Who is Jennifer Lawrence? Is it that 12 year old looking chick on the cover of Vanity Fair there? Where is hannahjs when I need her opinion to keep me from saying the stupid thing I want to say. You know Jennifer Lawrence should sit down and talk to Taylor Swift. That young woman has a very solid grasp of things Internet, new media, social networking. Not only does she understand them, but she’s using them to her advantage.

    1. If you think the girl on the cover of Vanity Fair looks like a 12-yo, I really think you need to visit an ophthalmologist for a check-up; you seem to have some issues with your visual acuity.

    2. Thelonious, I commented privately to one who would understand me without projecting his own thoughts and emotions onto my words—an every-day hazard in a public forum like this.

      Thus any benefit my wisdom (such as it is) might have provided in the way of guidance is cloistered. In the same way that the naked images ought to have done, as has been widely sermonised already. Unless someone hacks my email. In which case I would stand in the same spotlight as Jennifer Lawrence. Please excuse me—I must hurry and change my password from Tall-Irishwoman66 to nme6223L5n-KMSA-fluglehorn-005cRHjs_pwn

    1. Nineteen Eighty-Four? Curious. So you’re saying that if she was familiar with the definitive dystopian novel about the dangers of big oppressive socialist governments, the stripping of individual rights from citizens, governments that keep their citizens in a state of fear under perpetual surveillance, governments that don’t just lie but manufacture reality to control their citizens, i.e. real totalitarianism, she would understand morons hacking nude selfies?

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