Apple pulls away from Exxon in world’s most valuable company race

“In January, with Apple’s share price in a tailspin, the big news everywhere from the Wall Street Journal to the Huffington Post was that Exxon was once again the market cap king — the world’s most valuable company,” Phillip Elmer-Dewitt reports for Fortune.

“When Apple retook the lead the next day,” P.E.D. reports, “almost no one noticed.”

MacDailyNews Take: We did: Apple reassumes throne as World’s Most Valuable Company – January 28, 2013

P.E.D. writes, “Perhaps that news didn’t fit the Apple-is-doomed narrative.”

MacDailyNews Take: Exactly.

“Now, having lost and regained the lead several times since, Apple is once again pulling away from the oil giant,” P.E.D reports. “By midday Monday, with Apple at $434.4 billion and Exxon at $404.8.”

Full article, with market cap comparison chart, here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Ellis D.” for the heads up.]

Related articles:
Apple retakes most valuable company crown from Exxon Mobil – April 29, 2013
Apple retakes most valuable company crown from Exxon Mobil – March 5, 2013
Apple stock continues drop; market cap falls below $400 billion; value crown ceded back to Exxon Mobil – March 4, 2013
Apple reassumes throne as World’s Most Valuable Company – January 28, 2013
Apple loses ‘World’s Most Valuable Company’ crown to Exxon Mobil – January 25, 2013
Apple overtakes Exxon Mobil as world’s most valuable company – August 9, 2011

10 Comments

    1. You’ve got to be kidding. Almost no one is giving Apple a snowball’s chance in hell of making any money from China. Most of Wall Street is betting on Samsung, ZTC and Huawei to take 90% market share in China. Where would Apple possibly get enough growth to carry Apple’s share price to $1000. You do realize Wall Street is all about market share? Apple share price isn’t likely to go up that high without it.

      Because you’re saying something about game changers, then it must be some unknown product. However, it would be required to have the same sort of profit margins and sales of the iPhone in order to grow Apple’s revenues further. It really doesn’t seem likely. Besides, it’s pretty much taken for granted that Samsung can easily copy anything Apple makes and sell more of it for a cheaper price.

      1. Wrong. Wall Street only cares about profit. Any charlatan can get strong market share by dumping products at or below cost. But if it’s not profitable, who cares? Not investors.

        On the other hand, and this may be the source of your confusion, idiot analysts do care about market share. There’s arithmetic involved in considering profit. Subtraction, to be precise. So they must be forgiven for not understanding it.

      2. You’re talking out of both sides of your mouth. First you say market share is the key (“You do realize Wall Street is all about market share?”), then you switch to “it would be required to have the same sort of profit margins and sales”
        without skipping a beat. While Apple margins will necessarily reduce over time due to increased sales globally, they still outperform almost every company in that category. There is no reason to doubt that their much higher profitability rate will continue to propel them much higher.

  1. Chasing the title of “the most valuable company” is become less relevant and borderline meaningless, as long as Apple continue to be itself + continue to provide the best user experiences on its eco-systems. IMHO.

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