Apple and Intel secretly building Bluetooth smartwatch that connects to your iOS devices, say sources

“Two sources from the ‘supply chain’ told Chinese tech blog TGbus.com (relayed by the usually reliable Netease / Tech.163) that Apple and Intel are jointly building a Bluetooth-equipped smart wristwatch that can connect to other iOS devices, most notably iPhone and iPod devices,” Robin Wauters reports for TNW. “According to the same sources, the Apple smartwatch could find its way to the market in the first half of 2013 and sport a 1.5-inch OLED display with indium tin oxide, aka ITO-coated glass, made by Taiwanese PMOLED panel manufacturer RiTdisplay.”

Wauters writes, “Think about it: a small computer – or a custom version of the iPod Nano if you will – that you can wear on your wrist, connects to your iPhone like the Nike+ Fuelband and plenty of other products can, and supports Siri voice control. It would make sense.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: And, if this is real, Apple needs Intel for what, exactly? Their unmatched ability to sap battery life at exponential rates? Smartwatches shouldn’t require cooling fans.

And, seriously, who under age 50 wears a watch anymore, anyway? That said, Apple could be looking at a staid industry in desperate need of revival as a suitable target for Apple innovation. Still, the Intel connection mystifies.

Take this one with many grains of salt.

44 Comments

        1. Actually, it normally shows a clock. I swipe up and down, it places a facetime call. I swipe right twice, it makes a normal call. I swipe twice left, it shows me ticker prices, temperature, or whatever I have configured. Make it a 40 dollar device and everybody in the family will have one.

  1. Hmm. I’m not sure what features would compel me to talk into a wrist watch. I stopped wearing a watch several years ago. Like many people, I use my phone for the time and dozens of other things.

    1. MDN have “forgotten” nothing. Rather, it looks like you forgot to continue reading.

      MDN’s very next sentence after the one you quoted:

      “That said, Apple could be looking at a staid industry in desperate need of revival as a suitable target for Apple innovation.”

  2. I would humbly suggest that Apple focus on watch accuracy before they add Bluetooth connectivity. The iPod Nano, for example is a lousy watch because you can’t set it to the correct second. You can only set it to the minute. Not very “smart” in my opinion.

  3. I haven’t worn a watch in years unless you count some important meetings or weddings – times when it’s more an accessory more than a tool. And even then I’d catch myself peeking at my iPhone for the time because I’d forget I’m wearing a timepiece.

    That all said, if Apple can bring something new and useful to the watch I’d be a buyer at a certain price point. It would need to be a few things for me, though. It would have to be extremely classy with high quality materials — not a toy. In addition, I think a nice touch would be a screen that appears very clear and high res from a particular viewing angle but obscured from any other angle. It’s just practical because you can so easily adjust the angle with your hand and it would make for needed privacy. Another very cool touch (if it’s possible) would be that it looks like a mechanical watch from every angle accept the exact one used for information display. That would be really cool.

    1. And… The watch has 16 motion and temperature controls and gyroscopes. It shoots out infrared beams to your hand and fingers to recognize your finger position and movements.

      Then you can control sign boards and advertising signs or drive your car with the wave of your hand

  4. “And, seriously, who under age 50 wears a watch anymore, anyway? ”

    Well, many young fellows who likes to dress well. Watches are one of the few pieces of jewelry men can wear. There is more to personal appearance than jeans, sweatshirts and baseball caps worn backwards.

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