Nielsen: More U.S. teens listen to music via YouTube than iTunes, CDs, or radio

Radio is still the dominant way people discover music (48%) – followed by tips from friends/relatives (10%), and YouTube (7%), but more teens listen to music through YouTube than through any other source (64%) — followed by radio (56%) and iTunes (53% ) and CDs (50%) – according to results from a comprehensive, in-depth Nielsen study of consumer interaction with music in the United States, the Music 360. The new Nielsen report offers insights on all aspects of music consumption including listening and purchasing behaviors; music discovery; live events; the use of social networking and mobile music apps; as well as how the economy is affecting music sales.

“The accessibility of music has seen tremendous expansion and diversification,” said David Bakula, SVP Client Development, Nielsen, in the press release. “While younger listeners opt for technologically advanced methods , traditional methods of discovery like radio and word-of-mouth continue to be strong drivers. With so many ways to purchase, consume and discover great new music, it’s no wonder that the consumer continues to access and enjoy music in greater numbers.”

The following is a small sampling of insights included in the Music 360 report:

Radio is still the dominant way people discover music
• 48% discover music most often through the radio
• 10% discover music most often through friends/relatives
• 7% discover music most often through YouTube

More teens listen to music through YouTube than through any other source
• 64% of teens listen to music through YouTube
• 56% of teens listen to music on the radio
• 53% of teens listen to music through iTunes
• 50% of teens listen to music on CD

Positive recommendations from a friend are most likely to influence purchase decisions
• 54% are more likely to make a purchase based off a positive recommendation from a friend
• 25% are more likely to make a purchase based off a music blog/chat rooms
• 12% are more likely to make a purchase based off an endorsement from a brand
• 8% of all respondents share music on social networking sites, while 6% upload music.

Music player apps are most prevalent, followed by radio and music store apps
• 54% have music player apps on their smartphones
• 47% have radio apps on their smartphones
• 26% have music store apps on their smartphones

Males purchase rock music most often, while females prefer top 40
• 38% of males purchase rock most often
• 15% of females (compared to 9% of males) purchase top 40 most often

Digital music is seen as a slightly better value than a physical CD
• 63% of purchasers identified digital albums as a very or fairly good value
• 61% identified digital tracks as a very or fairly good value
• 55% identified physical CDs as a very or fairly good value

Younger consumers who do buy digital tracks, are more likely to purchase new music immediately after its release
• 33% of teens purchased a digital track within one week of release
• 21% of persons 18+ purchased a digital track within one week of release
• 36% of teens have bought a CD in the last year; 51% of teens have purchased some kind of music download

18-24 year olds are most likely to attend a music event (among those who attend any type of live event)
• 7% attending once a week or more
• 30% attending once a month

Although 18-24 year olds attend more live events, teens are more likely to purchase T-shirts and posters while there.
• 54% (compared to 46% of 18-24 year olds) of teen attendees purchase concert tees
• 14% (compared to 7% of 18-24 year olds) of teen attendees purchase concert posters

Listeners enjoy hearing movie soundtracks over music related TV shows or video games
• 42% enjoy hearing music via music related TV show
• 59% enjoy hearing music via movie soundtracks
• 28% enjoy hearing music via music related video games

Older consumers have decreased their spending the most during the current economy
• 41% of respondents 55+ reduced their spending to a large degree
• 39% of respondents 45-54 reduced their spending to a large degree
• Only 28% of respondents age 25-34 reduced their spending to a large degree

Data for Music 360 were collected via 3,000 online consumer surveys using Nielsen’s proprietary, high-quality ePanel in the United States. Topics addressed in this study include: where/when music is consumed, through which device(s), apps and services; digital vs. physical purchases; the process of discovery, and how/when discovery converts to purchase; insights around spending, share of wallet, and retailer preferences; live events; and much more.

Source: Nielsen Holdings N.V.

34 Comments

  1. I find it funny that the US gov slams a company like MegaUpload for allowing people to UL/stream music/movie content, but let’s Google/YouTube get away with it.

    1. You should snitch on them. Dot Com would give you your very own domain,

      in the Sixth Circle of Hell.

      “From these two, art and nature, it is fitting,
      if you recall how Genesis begins,
      for men to make their way, to gain their living;
      and since the usurer prefers another
      pathway, he scorns both nature in herself
      and art her follower; his hope is elsewhere.

      Inferno, Canto XI, lines 106–111, Mandelbaum translation.

      And let’s be real, it’s not the “US government”, it’s America’s number one law enforcement officer on the beat (drum) shakin’ out a service industry to see what falls from grace.

      Like the War On Drugs, arresting piracy is a fool’s errand. Brilliant minds will always outwit the developers and exploit their human weakness.

      But, let’s be clear, Google has a strict legal policy. They can’t be held accountable for piracy if they can’t catch everyone. The Government does what it can to monitor Google as they monitor their own constituency. But how effective is that, if listening to music on YouTube is becoming a trend?

      What we’re really talking about here is tolerance of theft, real or imagined and the money being stolen isn’t yours or mine or the governments, it’s the insurance companies’ money. Billions in claims are being shoveled into Yes/No hoppers and only twenty-five percent ever see human hands, the rest are OCR’d and ciphered and a canned denial is delivered automatically.

      This is a war of machines; Insurance servers against the rest of us. We are in a war of entitlement with the insurance companies. We spend more money on a future — that doesn’t even include us — with life insurance and all its derivatives and the costs are rising by an order of magnitude each decade, and what have we got in the moment? Whatever it is, we don’t have time to enjoy it.

      What’s really taking place at Google (and elsewhere) is Sampling.

      It’s a science of ratios and risk assessment and their impact on models of efficiency, legality, MDN, et. al., and as far as I can tell, Google is safe. And so is the music. I don’t care where you leave it, it’s always there.

      Google is too big to arrest, much less indict. There isn’t a courtroom big enough to carry the workload of an endless stream of lawyers from Google to Holder’s office, causing him to back peddle in the face of so much taxpayer scrutiny over a boondoggle. ( If ever pressed, I’d love to know “who” is winning/losing the war on drugs? )

      The point is, piracy can’t be stopped and just as sure as a frog will change genders to keep its species alive, pirates will do even better, they become foxy monitors.

      Just like all those USDA inspectors out there climbing all over your food with their shitty boots on!

  2. “26% have music store apps on their smartphones”
    That’s hard to believe. It would mean that only one quarter of smartphone owners have iPhones, and that no one with a non iOS smartphone bothers to download a music store app. Something’s very odd about this statistic.

  3. “Radio is still the dominant way people discover music… ”

    What an idiot to think that you can glean a new artist from radio! It’s always been by word of mouth if you want to listen to something of value, not parasitic commercial laced radio. Next would be reading reviews by Spin, Pitchfork, etc and listening to their samples. Radio! Hysterical!

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