5 ways Apple’s Mac App Store will rock the Macintosh platform

Parallels Desktop 6 for Mac “Frankly, I’m surprised at how excited I am to see the Mac App Store coming Jan. 6. For me, first and foremost, it’s about easy application discovery and instant buying from a trusted source,” Chris Maxcer writes for MacNewsWorld.

“Sure, you can download many Mac apps from a variety of developer websites, but then you’re also sharing a lot of key details about your identity, home and billing information,” Maxcer writes. “In an age where cybercriminals are becoming increasingly sophisticated, I like to try to reduce my exposure. Some of these innovative developers are just dudes in a garage, and when push comes to shove — say, their brother gets in too deep with some gambling debts made in the shady areas of Vegas — what are they going to do? Hold an online fire sale to drum up some quick cash?”

Maxcer writes, “According to the latest rumors, iWork ’09 is slipping out of stock, paving the way for iWork ’11. And wouldn’t Apple like to deliver iWork ’11 with its brand new Mac App Store? I think so, and I’m due for an iWork upgrade. So how might this benefit me? Instant download gratification and no shipping charges. I’m in.”

Still, there’s a lot more to like about Apple’s deceptively awesome Mac App Store:
1. Easy App Discovery From a Trusted Source
2. New Easy Installation
3. New Licensing Terms
4. Easy Update Discovery
5. Big Crowd Reviews

Full article, which covers all five points above, here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Johnny Bravo” for the heads up.]

21 Comments

  1. I love the idea of a Mac app store, but I take exception with the shoddy reporting of the story.

    Most small developers like the ones they are describing here use a system like Paypal or Kagi to process their payments. It’s not like they have a clipboard sitting there with all these credit card numbers written on them. That’s just really sloppy writing.

  2. Developers, developers, developers. Guaranteed if the Mac App Store is successful, Microsoft will follow up with one almost immediately, most likely saying their Windows App Store had been in development for years and it’s merely coincidental it came a few months later than Apple’s. The Wintard fanbois will probably hate the idea of a Windows App Store, because they’re such a superior bunch that don’t need anything simplified. They’re rather continue to keep searching around the internet for their own stuff.

    Low-tech Mac users should love the idea of a centralized software store. The explosion of developers on the Mac platform will drive sales of Mac software and hardware to an all-time high. The Mac App Store is sure to be a success even if it doesn’t match the iOS App Store. If games don’t take off on the Mac after the Mac App Store opens, they never will.

  3. I agree that this could lead to a greater interest in developing for the Mac. As I’ve said before, I almost never buy applications for my Mac, and each time MDN posts one of those “Ten applications every Mac user must have” lists, I haven’t heard of any of them. Having a Mac app store will help expose me to games, productivity applications, and tools I wouldn’t otherwise have discovered. And I would gladly pay a little for new games for my kids to get them off the daggone Flash game sites. One of those actually ruined my old iMac 24″.

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