Google battles to keep talent; gives 10% raise to 23,000 employees

“Google Inc. is fighting off Facebook Inc. and other fast-growing Internet firms that are poaching its staff, a reversal for a company that has long been one of Silicon Valley’s hottest job destinations,” Amir Efrati and Pui-Wing Tam report for The Wall Street Journal.

“Among the defectors are engineers such as Cedric Beust. The 41-year-old spent six years at Google working on projects like the mobile operating system Android,” Efrati and Tam report. “But by this year, ‘”I was ready for something different and more challenging,’ he said.”

MacDailyNews Take: Tired of copying Apple already? Imagine how short a stint he would have completed at Microsoft.

“Much of the most recent hiring battles have centered on Facebook and Google,” Efrati and Tam report. “According to data from LinkedIn, 137 Facebook employees previously worked at Google. Among Google’s recent departures to Facebook: Lars Rasmussen, co-founder of Google Maps. Google Chrome architect Matthew Papakipos, Android senior product manager Erick Tseng, and top Google ad executive David Fischer also decamped to Facebook earlier this year.”

Efrati and Tam report, “To help attract new recruits and preempt defections, Google Tuesday said it was giving a 10% raise to its more than 23,000 employees.”

Read more in the full article here.

13 Comments

  1. @m159: And why should there be, when employers’ loyalty to their employees is so little? Outsourcing to India, and downsizing so the bosses get bonuses for “saving the company money” ring any bells?

  2. @m159:

    With good reason. In general, what loyalty have employers shown their employees? Google and Facebook actually aren’t good examples because they are outliers on many levels, from location cost of living to company age/growth. In short order, Google and Facebook will act just like every other shortsighted corporation:

    For knowledge workers, most incentives are short-term, and work/life balance is ignored. No 40-hour workweek here – electronic tether keeps you on the clock 7 days a week. Demand results on unrealistic schedule plans that include no consideration for players who don’t speak your language fluently or live on the same continent, marginalize quality of work for sake of “process efficiency”, beat the worker under threat of outsourcing, and then when the project is over, throw away the worker. When a new project comes along, hire a young worker who costs less. No regard for long-term knowledge capture, efficiency gains, or training costs. And it’s not just “tech” companies, it’s everywhere.

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