Apple drops Mac mini price in markets outside of U.S.

Apple Online StoreReghardware reports that Apple has dropped the price on Mac mini: “The diminutive desktop Mac – it’s just 197 x 197 x 36mm – was, at launch, priced at £649. That bought you a 2.4GHz Core 2 Duo processor, 2GB of 1067MHz DDR 3 memory, a 320GB 5400rpm Sata hard drive, 8x multi-format DVD writer and Nvidia GeForce 320M graphics integrated into the chipset. The spec hasn’t changed, but the price is now £599.”

Full article here.

Apple has dropped the Mac mini price in many markets outside of the U.S.

Check your country’s online Apple Store for the new pricing.

26 Comments

  1. Apple adjusted the price to reflect the devaluation of the Dollar from when the Mini was released, it’s not a surprise they do it all the time it’s just that no one typically notices.

  2. Apple adjusted the price to reflect the devaluation of the Dollar from when the Mini was released, it’s not a surprise they do it all the time it’s just that no one typically notices.

  3. Americans are quite fortunate that Apple is a US company. Even when you had to pay 1.6 $US for 1 Euro, our Macs were still the same price as always. Tourists from EU were flooding NY on their shopping trips — US felt like some banana republic, where everything is dirt cheap, because to them, it is. The plummeting exchange rate, coupled with ridiculously low retail (value-added) tax (compared to virtually all EU countries) makes consumer electronics in US 30% cheaper than in EU. Same for most other goods. In other words, if you live in an EU country, and plan on buying a high-end MacBook Pro, instead of buying one in Germany or France, for the same money, you can fly for a weekend in New York (for free) and buy a new MBP there.

    These price adjustments outside of EU are not as often as the currency fluctuations, and are usually not nearly as drastic.

  4. Americans are quite fortunate that Apple is a US company. Even when you had to pay 1.6 $US for 1 Euro, our Macs were still the same price as always. Tourists from EU were flooding NY on their shopping trips — US felt like some banana republic, where everything is dirt cheap, because to them, it is. The plummeting exchange rate, coupled with ridiculously low retail (value-added) tax (compared to virtually all EU countries) makes consumer electronics in US 30% cheaper than in EU. Same for most other goods. In other words, if you live in an EU country, and plan on buying a high-end MacBook Pro, instead of buying one in Germany or France, for the same money, you can fly for a weekend in New York (for free) and buy a new MBP there.

    These price adjustments outside of EU are not as often as the currency fluctuations, and are usually not nearly as drastic.

  5. Exchange rates are dynamic for the most part. If you look outside of your own country, you will always find places where a particular product may be cheaper than in your own country. You can also find places where a particular product may be more expensive than in your own country. Companies, for the most part, don’t try to punish consumers in other countries by setting prices higher than in their home country. They try to set prices that are stable, from a local perspective, and yet give them a cushion due to historical exchange rate fluctuations.

  6. Exchange rates are dynamic for the most part. If you look outside of your own country, you will always find places where a particular product may be cheaper than in your own country. You can also find places where a particular product may be more expensive than in your own country. Companies, for the most part, don’t try to punish consumers in other countries by setting prices higher than in their home country. They try to set prices that are stable, from a local perspective, and yet give them a cushion due to historical exchange rate fluctuations.

  7. DUH! writes, “Apple adjusted the price to reflect the devaluation of the Dollar from when the Mini was released, it’s not a surprise they do it all the time it’s just that no one typically notices.”

    I don’t see what the dollar has to do with it. It’s not like it’s made in the US. The UK gets it air-shipped from China just like we do in the US.

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