Microsoft looking like an end-stage company

InvisibleSHIELD.  Scratch Proof your iPhone 4!“I believe that Microsoft as we know it may not be around in another decade–maybe not even in five years,” Paul McDougall writes for InformationWeek.

“There’s hardly a single tech industry trend line pointing in Redmond’s favor right now, and some of those curves are about to get a lot steeper, real fast,” McDougall writes. “So it’s hardly surprising recent Microsoft-related news has been pretty much on par with where things stand for the company these days—mostly all bad.”

McDougall writes, “Market research group NPD recently found that 13% of iPad users bought the Apple OS-based device instead of a Windows PC. That’s a hugely significant number for a product that didn’t even exist a year ago. Just wait until it gets more features, and comes down in price.”

“Microsoft’s Windows Phone 7 will hit stores in November, but most analysts believe the offering, though slick in many respects, is too little, too late to meaningful bolster the company’s meager 5% share of the mobile OS market,” McDougall writes. “Where does all this leave Microsoft? Out in the cold within just the next few years unless big changes are made—and those changes need to start at the top.”

Read the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Windows Phone ’07 will likely be the last straw for Ballmer’s reign as Microsoft CEO.

Excerpts from a BusinessWeek interview with Apple CEO Steve Jobs, October 12, 2004:

Steve Jobs: Apple had a monopoly on the graphical user interface for almost 10 years. That’s a long time. And how are monopolies lost? Think about it. Some very good product people invent some very good products, and the company achieves a monopoly. But after that, the product people aren’t the ones that drive the company forward anymore. It’s the marketing guys or the ones who expand the business into Latin America or whatever. Because what’s the point of focusing on making the product even better when the only company you can take business from is yourself? So a different group of people start to move up. And who usually ends up running the show? The sales guy… Then one day, the monopoly expires for whatever reason. But by then the best product people have left, or they’re no longer listened to. And so the company goes through this tumultuous time, and it either survives or it doesn’t.

BusinessWeek: Is this common in the industry?
Steve Jobs: Look at Microsoft — who’s running Microsoft?

BusinessWeek: Steve Ballmer.
Steve Jobs: Right, the sales guy. Case closed.

221 Comments

  1. I know this argument has been repeated, that Apple is a hardware company and all, that selling OS X separate from hardware would result in one lost hardware sale for each copy of OS X for PC’s sold, yada, yada, yada.

    But I’ve come to a sudden revelation, Apple’s hardware chiefly caters to the computer ignorant, who can’t even back up their files routinely or burn a disk, or clone their boot drive (thus the TimeMachine nag), much less go through the rigors of installing a operating system on a PC with all the BIOs, drivers and other headaches associated with such a endeavor.

    So if installing a operating system is for the skilled, and the skilled would choose any OS they like, like Linux for instance. Linux having it’s drawbacks of the lack of commercial software.

    Wouldn’t Apple’s OS X market share increase drastically if they sold a PC version, the benefits of commercial software and a secure OS being the benefit?

    This would kill Microsoft and Apple would take it’s place.

    A plan or what?

  2. I know this argument has been repeated, that Apple is a hardware company and all, that selling OS X separate from hardware would result in one lost hardware sale for each copy of OS X for PC’s sold, yada, yada, yada.

    But I’ve come to a sudden revelation, Apple’s hardware chiefly caters to the computer ignorant, who can’t even back up their files routinely or burn a disk, or clone their boot drive (thus the TimeMachine nag), much less go through the rigors of installing a operating system on a PC with all the BIOs, drivers and other headaches associated with such a endeavor.

    So if installing a operating system is for the skilled, and the skilled would choose any OS they like, like Linux for instance. Linux having it’s drawbacks of the lack of commercial software.

    Wouldn’t Apple’s OS X market share increase drastically if they sold a PC version, the benefits of commercial software and a secure OS being the benefit?

    This would kill Microsoft and Apple would take it’s place.

    A plan or what?

  3. Google could take a very big bite out of Microsoft with their idiot proof Chrome OS and their Office type Apps in the cloud. That’s less than a year away.

    Microsoft could easily be a bit player in 5 years.

  4. Google could take a very big bite out of Microsoft with their idiot proof Chrome OS and their Office type Apps in the cloud. That’s less than a year away.

    Microsoft could easily be a bit player in 5 years.

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