Apple deprecates its release of Java for Mac OS X

Apple Store“Apple’s latest release of Java SE 6 for Mac OS X marks the end of the company’s efforts to maintain Java releases for the Mac platform itself,” Daniel Eran Dilger reports for AppleInsider.

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“Yesterday, the company released ‘Java for Mac OS X 10.6 Update 3,’ which brought Apple’s bundled support for Java SE 6 in Snow Leopard up to version 1.6.0_22, and ‘Java for Mac OS X 10.5 Update 8,’ which similarly updated Leopard,” Dilger reports. “However, the company now notes that ‘as of the release of Java for Mac OS X 10.6 Update 3, the version of Java that is ported by Apple, and that ships with Mac OS X, is deprecated. This means that the Apple-produced runtime will not be maintained at the same level, and may be removed from future versions of Mac OS X. The Java runtime shipping in Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard, and Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard, will continue to be supported and maintained through the standard support cycles of those products.'”

Dilger reports, “Apple has also reorganized how Java runtime homes are installed on Mac OS X, apparently in an effort to facilitate third party releases of the Java virtual machine. This would enable Oracle (which recently acquired Sun) to release Java for the Mac itself, rather than waiting for Apple do maintain its own Java release for Mac users.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Note: Get Java for Mac OS X updates via Software Update or via standalone installer.

More info and download links:
• Java for Mac OS X 10.6 Update 3
• Java for Mac OS X 10.5 Update 8

38 Comments

  1. Apple could also push developers off OS X, too. Where I work, just about every OS X user is a Java developer. None are Objective-C developers. (A few OS X users do not do development.) If there is no longer a supported JVM for OS X, we’ll be forced to abandon OS X for Windows. I do not want to see that day.

  2. Apple could also push developers off OS X, too. Where I work, just about every OS X user is a Java developer. None are Objective-C developers. (A few OS X users do not do development.) If there is no longer a supported JVM for OS X, we’ll be forced to abandon OS X for Windows. I do not want to see that day.

  3. There are some significant programs that use java for their UI to make cross-platform coding a lot easier/feasible. I wonder if they’ll keep developing for Macs. Even though market share is double-digits, maintaining two code bases is expensive.

  4. There are some significant programs that use java for their UI to make cross-platform coding a lot easier/feasible. I wonder if they’ll keep developing for Macs. Even though market share is double-digits, maintaining two code bases is expensive.

  5. Quite a few people complained about Apple being slow in rolling out Java releases. If this change makes it easier to offload the work to Oracle, that would be a good thing, right? Apple not supporting something is not the same as forcing its exclusion.

  6. Quite a few people complained about Apple being slow in rolling out Java releases. If this change makes it easier to offload the work to Oracle, that would be a good thing, right? Apple not supporting something is not the same as forcing its exclusion.

  7. ploogman has a point. OS X’s early adopters were developers and it’s at their conferences that one first saw the wall of glowing Apple logos from a lectern. The fact that OS X shipped with Java, Php, Ruby, Python, GNU C, among other tools is one of the things that has attracted the developer community to OS X. Hope Apple keeps that vision of inclusiveness alive.

  8. ploogman has a point. OS X’s early adopters were developers and it’s at their conferences that one first saw the wall of glowing Apple logos from a lectern. The fact that OS X shipped with Java, Php, Ruby, Python, GNU C, among other tools is one of the things that has attracted the developer community to OS X. Hope Apple keeps that vision of inclusiveness alive.

  9. Another thought. May be some Apple employees (ones who were working on the JVM at Apple) will be making left turn into the parking lot in the morning instead of right turn (or right turn instead of left turn).

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