Apple clearly lays out Mac App Store guidelines for developers

Apple Store“When Apple opened the iPhone App Store two years ago, it was criticized for the lack of transparency in its approval process as some apps were rejected without explanation,” Yukari Iwatani Kane reports for The Wall Street Journal. “The company isn’t making the same mistake twice.”

Advertisement: Do more with photos, movies and music on your Mac. Upgrade to the new iLife ’11 for just $49 at the Apple Online Store.

“Just a day after Apple announced that it was planning to open a Mac app store in the next 90 days, the company published detailed guidelines for its app review process–addressing everything from the way a program works and its user interface to the kinds of content that it will reject,” Kane reports.

Kane reports, “The privacy section covers rules forbidding the transmission of user data without prior permission and providing the user with access to information about how and where the data will be used. Other don’ts: apps that create a store inside themselves for selling or distributing other software, apps that scrape any information from Apple sites, apps intended to trick or fake functionality, and spam apps (many versions of similar apps).”

Read more in the full article here.

AppleInsider reports, “Apple insists that apps must follow the Apple Macintosh Human Interface Guidelines, including the user of buttons and icons, but says it will reject apps that that look similar to existing Apple products, including the Finder, iChat, iTunes, and Dashboard. It will also reject apps that change the native user interface elements or behaviors of Mac OS X. The company says it sets a high bar for user interface quality, and ‘if your user interface is complex or less than very good it may be rejected.'”

“Apps that are defamatory, offensive, mean-spirited, or likely to place the targeted individual or group in harms way will be rejected, although Apple notes that professional political satirists and humorists are exempt from the ban on offensive or mean-spirited commentary,” AppleInsider reports.

Much more in the full article here.

Apple’s App Store Review Guidelines are here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “iWill” for the heads up.]

24 Comments

  1. man for some reason right before I read through it I thought applescript would fall under deprecated technologies
    I just read through though and was extremely pleased and agreed with every line of it (although we still need non app-store apps for stuff like cocoa packet analyzer and bonjour browser)

    man I need to get a mac developer program membership!! 😀

  2. man for some reason right before I read through it I thought applescript would fall under deprecated technologies
    I just read through though and was extremely pleased and agreed with every line of it (although we still need non app-store apps for stuff like cocoa packet analyzer and bonjour browser)

    man I need to get a mac developer program membership!! 😀

  3. Another market where people can complain about arbitrarily rejected apps.

    However, this is huge for Apple in that they will make money from $5 apps, while the old software business of hundreds of dollars for a shrinkwrapped disk (Adobe, Microsoft) will die before our eyes in less than 5 years.

  4. Another market where people can complain about arbitrarily rejected apps.

    However, this is huge for Apple in that they will make money from $5 apps, while the old software business of hundreds of dollars for a shrinkwrapped disk (Adobe, Microsoft) will die before our eyes in less than 5 years.

  5. @samiam
    um.. what is that supposed to mean?
    you publish your app to the app store and put the source code on your web site

    now if you mean how will your @*%&@ing gplx liscencess will be handled? I think the world would be much better without them (and I think apple agrees)

  6. @samiam
    um.. what is that supposed to mean?
    you publish your app to the app store and put the source code on your web site

    now if you mean how will your @*%&@ing gplx liscencess will be handled? I think the world would be much better without them (and I think apple agrees)

  7. As long as there are multiple ways to install apps on a Mac, NO ONE has any reason to complain about these guidelines.

    But if Apple at some point makes this the only avenue for developers to get on the Mac, there will be a “virtual” riot — and there should be.

    I like the way things work on Apple mobile products — but my full-fledged laptop and desktop machines shouldn’t be treated the same. That said, I can see myself getting my apps almost exclusively from the app store (exceptions might be design software).

  8. As long as there are multiple ways to install apps on a Mac, NO ONE has any reason to complain about these guidelines.

    But if Apple at some point makes this the only avenue for developers to get on the Mac, there will be a “virtual” riot — and there should be.

    I like the way things work on Apple mobile products — but my full-fledged laptop and desktop machines shouldn’t be treated the same. That said, I can see myself getting my apps almost exclusively from the app store (exceptions might be design software).

Reader Feedback

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.