Apple iChat to morph into ‘FaceTime’ in iLife ‘11?

Apple Online Store“The online scuttlebutt says iLife 2011 is coming very soon, dropping iDVD and adding a new app,” Dennis Sellers writes for Macsimum News. “I think that’s about right, and I think that new app may be a hybrid of FaceTime and iChat. (FaceChat? iTime? Naw, Apple will probably just call it FaceTime.)”

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“Right now FaceTime only works iPhone 4/iPod touch to iPhone 4/iPod touch. However, since all Macs but the Mac mini and Mac Pro have built-in iSight cameras (though, obviously, webcams can be attached), it only makes sense to extend FaceTime to our favorite computing platform,” Sellers writes. “All Macs come with iChat, so it might make sense to merge iChat and FaceTime into one app.”

Sellers writes, “That should move lots of extra Macs. But Apple is offering FaceTime as an open standard, so the company is doubtless figuring Windows systems into the equation at some point in the future.”

Full article here.

48 Comments

  1. This sounds like a bad idea – why put iChat into iLife? Some older systems which are perfectly capable of running iChat struggle with later versions of iLife. So just add FaceTime support to iChat.

    And leave iDVD in iLife – it is heavily used by us and it would be a real bummer if it went away (not everyone has his personal T1 line)

  2. This sounds like a bad idea – why put iChat into iLife? Some older systems which are perfectly capable of running iChat struggle with later versions of iLife. So just add FaceTime support to iChat.

    And leave iDVD in iLife – it is heavily used by us and it would be a real bummer if it went away (not everyone has his personal T1 line)

  3. I have an impression that iDVD will be folded into iMovie. Right now, no other consumer-oriented NLEs have DVD authoring separated from video editing (Premiere Elements, Sony Vegas, Pinnacle Studio, Ulead, Corel…). Higher-end solutions that need more features use independent (but well integrated) software packages for editing, authoring, effects, compression, etc. However, for consumers, it makes sense to consolidate the process into one single application. If that is the case, let us hope Steve finally agrees to allow AVCHD Disc authoring as well. All other software makers have long been offering such an option (over two years and two versions ago); Apple is the only stubborn one. I’m sure they genuinely believe everyone should upload their HD creations to YouTube and Vimeo. However, most of my kid’s classmates have Blu-ray at home, and none of them want to watch home videos on their computer. Not to mention that YouTube’s time limit of 15 minutes doesn’t allow any meaningful school event (Talent show, sports game, graduation ceremony) to fit.

    Blu-ray is the only reasonable shareable HD medium today. And on a Mac, it now costs money to have the ability to do it. iLife comes with every Mac and is supposed to let us share images and video with others; it doesn’t quite do that in HD.

  4. I have an impression that iDVD will be folded into iMovie. Right now, no other consumer-oriented NLEs have DVD authoring separated from video editing (Premiere Elements, Sony Vegas, Pinnacle Studio, Ulead, Corel…). Higher-end solutions that need more features use independent (but well integrated) software packages for editing, authoring, effects, compression, etc. However, for consumers, it makes sense to consolidate the process into one single application. If that is the case, let us hope Steve finally agrees to allow AVCHD Disc authoring as well. All other software makers have long been offering such an option (over two years and two versions ago); Apple is the only stubborn one. I’m sure they genuinely believe everyone should upload their HD creations to YouTube and Vimeo. However, most of my kid’s classmates have Blu-ray at home, and none of them want to watch home videos on their computer. Not to mention that YouTube’s time limit of 15 minutes doesn’t allow any meaningful school event (Talent show, sports game, graduation ceremony) to fit.

    Blu-ray is the only reasonable shareable HD medium today. And on a Mac, it now costs money to have the ability to do it. iLife comes with every Mac and is supposed to let us share images and video with others; it doesn’t quite do that in HD.

  5. As for iChat/FaceTime, I’m curious to see how this will go down. We currently have iChat, which runs on AOL’s AIM protocol; then we have FaceTime, which runs on Apple’s own protocol. To consolidate the two into one would mean abandoning one platform for the other, and leaving at least some users hanging. If Apple decided to abandon AIM, it would also abandon the ability to iChat (AV) with tens of millions AOL users out there. For Windows users, this was the only way to connect with iChat users (on Macs).

    On the other hand, there is only one significant advantage of iChat over other similar offering (such as Skype), and that is multi-party video conferencing. However, even that only works among Mac (iChat) users, and AIM people can’t play. Otherwise, iChat is quite cumbersome to work with, since it requires too many open ports in order to be usable outside of ordinary home environment (there is no way I can convince my IT security chief to open 50 different ports and port ranges, just so that I can use iChat to do AV conferencing).

    So, if AIM is about to be FaceTime-d, there will surely need to be some transitional period between AIM and FaceTime protocols, until everyone has smoothly transitioned over.

    One thing is certain: iLife has been overdue for a refresh for quite some time now.

  6. As for iChat/FaceTime, I’m curious to see how this will go down. We currently have iChat, which runs on AOL’s AIM protocol; then we have FaceTime, which runs on Apple’s own protocol. To consolidate the two into one would mean abandoning one platform for the other, and leaving at least some users hanging. If Apple decided to abandon AIM, it would also abandon the ability to iChat (AV) with tens of millions AOL users out there. For Windows users, this was the only way to connect with iChat users (on Macs).

    On the other hand, there is only one significant advantage of iChat over other similar offering (such as Skype), and that is multi-party video conferencing. However, even that only works among Mac (iChat) users, and AIM people can’t play. Otherwise, iChat is quite cumbersome to work with, since it requires too many open ports in order to be usable outside of ordinary home environment (there is no way I can convince my IT security chief to open 50 different ports and port ranges, just so that I can use iChat to do AV conferencing).

    So, if AIM is about to be FaceTime-d, there will surely need to be some transitional period between AIM and FaceTime protocols, until everyone has smoothly transitioned over.

    One thing is certain: iLife has been overdue for a refresh for quite some time now.

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