Analyst: Apple prepping new iPhone form factors, could ship soon

“Analyst Shaw Wu has stated that supply chain checks indicate signs of new form factor iPhones under development, including both larger and smaller touchscreens than the iPhone 4’s current 3.5-inch screen size,” Electronista reports.

“According to Kaufman Bros sources, the new models could be both a new high-end addition and a new low-end model,” Electronista reports. “While noting that Apple traditionally ships new iPhone models on an annual cycle, Wu speculates that the models under development could ship much sooner.”

Read more int he full article here.

77 Comments

  1. “Was it not Steve Jobs who slashed the Mac product line when he returned to Apple? And is it not the method that Apple employs to offer but a few models, unlike the beige box manufacturers? “

    It was also Steve Jobs who expanded the ipod line from one form factor to three.

    “Anything else is just a way to brag about the size of your male endowment. “

    But market share has an indirect effect on profit and earnings, because it attracts developers for apps, advertisers for ads, and helps Apple bargain for better terms from the likes of Verizon (and in the case of ipods and itunes, from content providers). And Apple has done quite a bit of bragging about its market share endowment for exactly these reasons.

    “Last I checked, Apple has been doing quite well for being but a mere minority of market share in many arenas.”

    True. But imagine how much better they could do with more market share in PCs and phones. Which is why there is still so much upside to their stock.

  2. “Was it not Steve Jobs who slashed the Mac product line when he returned to Apple? And is it not the method that Apple employs to offer but a few models, unlike the beige box manufacturers? “

    It was also Steve Jobs who expanded the ipod line from one form factor to three.

    “Anything else is just a way to brag about the size of your male endowment. “

    But market share has an indirect effect on profit and earnings, because it attracts developers for apps, advertisers for ads, and helps Apple bargain for better terms from the likes of Verizon (and in the case of ipods and itunes, from content providers). And Apple has done quite a bit of bragging about its market share endowment for exactly these reasons.

    “Last I checked, Apple has been doing quite well for being but a mere minority of market share in many arenas.”

    True. But imagine how much better they could do with more market share in PCs and phones. Which is why there is still so much upside to their stock.

  3. @sam wight

    form factor [′fȯrm ‚fak·tər]
    (electricity)
    The ratio of the effective value of a periodic function, such as an alternating current, to its average absolute value.
    A factor that takes the shape of a coil into account when computing its inductance. Also known as shape factor.
    (mechanics)
    The theoretical stress concentration factor for a given shape, for a perfectly elastic material.
    (physics)
    A function which describes the internal structure of a particle, allowing calculations to be made even though the structure is unknown.
    (quantum mechanics)
    An expression used in studying the scattering of electrons or radiation from atoms, nuclei, or elementary particles, which gives the deviation from point particle scattering due to the distribution of charge and current in the target.
    (hardware) form factor – The type of packaging of a processor integrated circuit, e.g. PPGA, FC-PGA.
    More generally, a term popular among marketroids in 1998, denoting the shape of something designed.

    marketroid – /mar’k*-troyd/ (Or “marketing slime”, “marketeer”, “marketing droid”, “marketdroid”) A member of a company’s marketing department, especially one who promises users that the next version of a product will have features that are not actually scheduled for inclusion, are extremely difficult to implement, and/or are in violation of the laws of physics; and/or one who describes existing features (and misfeatures) in ebullient, buzzword-laden adspeak. Derogatory.

    Why couldn’t they just say “signs of new models”
    instead of “signs of new form factor” ???

  4. @sam wight

    form factor [′fȯrm ‚fak·tər]
    (electricity)
    The ratio of the effective value of a periodic function, such as an alternating current, to its average absolute value.
    A factor that takes the shape of a coil into account when computing its inductance. Also known as shape factor.
    (mechanics)
    The theoretical stress concentration factor for a given shape, for a perfectly elastic material.
    (physics)
    A function which describes the internal structure of a particle, allowing calculations to be made even though the structure is unknown.
    (quantum mechanics)
    An expression used in studying the scattering of electrons or radiation from atoms, nuclei, or elementary particles, which gives the deviation from point particle scattering due to the distribution of charge and current in the target.
    (hardware) form factor – The type of packaging of a processor integrated circuit, e.g. PPGA, FC-PGA.
    More generally, a term popular among marketroids in 1998, denoting the shape of something designed.

    marketroid – /mar’k*-troyd/ (Or “marketing slime”, “marketeer”, “marketing droid”, “marketdroid”) A member of a company’s marketing department, especially one who promises users that the next version of a product will have features that are not actually scheduled for inclusion, are extremely difficult to implement, and/or are in violation of the laws of physics; and/or one who describes existing features (and misfeatures) in ebullient, buzzword-laden adspeak. Derogatory.

    Why couldn’t they just say “signs of new models”
    instead of “signs of new form factor” ???

  5. @daugav369pils

    “More generally, a term popular among marketroids in 1998, denoting the shape of something designed.

    marketroid – /mar’k*-troyd/ (Or “marketing slime”, “marketeer”, “marketing droid”, “marketdroid”) A member of a company’s marketing department, especially one who promises users that the next version of a product will have features that are not actually scheduled for inclusion, are extremely difficult to implement, and/or are in violation of the laws of physics; and/or one who describes existing features (and misfeatures) in ebullient, buzzword-laden adspeak. Derogatory.”

    So, you do know what it means. You just don’t like people using the term.

    Anyway, your quote was written in 2000, and it’s 2010 now, and in the sources I mentioned, the following definitions appear without any value judgement.

    form factor: The geometry of a product, especially in industrial and engineering design (Wikipedia)

    form factor: the physical size and shape of a piece of computer hardware (OS-X built-in dictionary)

    There is also no indication of it being denigrated in the google dictionary, or in yourdictionary.com.

    English is living and breathing, and “form factor” appears to have achieved general acceptance, at least going by all 4 *recent* entries in the dictionaries I checked.

    Of course it’s true that excessive jargon often impedes communication, sometimes making the language impenetrable, but this is clearly not the case for “form factor” in that headline.

    On the other hand, “marketroid”, used by the critics of “form factor” is almost certainly less understood than “form factor” itself, which is presumably why you found it necessary to provide the definition. And the definition provided is not exactly a model of effective communication. What is “ebullient, buzz-word-laden adspeak”, if not ebullient and buzz-word laden?

    “Why couldn’t they just say “signs of new models”
    instead of “signs of new form factor””

    Because it conveys much less information. iphone 1, 3g, 3gs, and 4 are all different models, but essentially the same form factor.

    They could have said “signs of larger and smaller models” as Apple Insider did (or was it MacRumors?), but that’s less compact.

  6. @daugav369pils

    “More generally, a term popular among marketroids in 1998, denoting the shape of something designed.

    marketroid – /mar’k*-troyd/ (Or “marketing slime”, “marketeer”, “marketing droid”, “marketdroid”) A member of a company’s marketing department, especially one who promises users that the next version of a product will have features that are not actually scheduled for inclusion, are extremely difficult to implement, and/or are in violation of the laws of physics; and/or one who describes existing features (and misfeatures) in ebullient, buzzword-laden adspeak. Derogatory.”

    So, you do know what it means. You just don’t like people using the term.

    Anyway, your quote was written in 2000, and it’s 2010 now, and in the sources I mentioned, the following definitions appear without any value judgement.

    form factor: The geometry of a product, especially in industrial and engineering design (Wikipedia)

    form factor: the physical size and shape of a piece of computer hardware (OS-X built-in dictionary)

    There is also no indication of it being denigrated in the google dictionary, or in yourdictionary.com.

    English is living and breathing, and “form factor” appears to have achieved general acceptance, at least going by all 4 *recent* entries in the dictionaries I checked.

    Of course it’s true that excessive jargon often impedes communication, sometimes making the language impenetrable, but this is clearly not the case for “form factor” in that headline.

    On the other hand, “marketroid”, used by the critics of “form factor” is almost certainly less understood than “form factor” itself, which is presumably why you found it necessary to provide the definition. And the definition provided is not exactly a model of effective communication. What is “ebullient, buzz-word-laden adspeak”, if not ebullient and buzz-word laden?

    “Why couldn’t they just say “signs of new models”
    instead of “signs of new form factor””

    Because it conveys much less information. iphone 1, 3g, 3gs, and 4 are all different models, but essentially the same form factor.

    They could have said “signs of larger and smaller models” as Apple Insider did (or was it MacRumors?), but that’s less compact.

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