Apple ordered to pay up to $625.5 million in damages to Mirror Worlds

“Apple Inc. was ordered by a jury to pay damages to Mirror Worlds LLC for infringing patents related to how documents are displayed on a computer screen,” Susan Decker reports for Bloomberg.

“The federal jury in Tyler, Texas, awarded $208.5 million in damages for each of the patents infringed. The verdict form was unclear as to whether the amount applies to the three patents collectively or would be charged individually. Lawyers for closely held Mirror Worlds declined to discuss the verdict,” Decker reports.

MacDailyNews Take: Tyler, Texas. Rocket Docket.

Decker reports, “Mirror Worlds, a software business started by a Yale University computer-science professor David Gelernter, claimed Apple’s iPod music device, iPhone and Mac computers infringed its patents. Apple challenged the validity of the patents and whether they were infringed, according to court records. Gelernter said after the verdict he was ‘tremendously grateful’ to his lawyers for ‘their overwhelmingly brilliant performance.'”

Full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Excessive.

34 Comments

  1. Given the magnitude of the verdict, an appeal by Apple is a certainty. It is still unclear to me why other companies can market products that are superficially very similar to an iPhone in form and function with apparent impunity (caveat – the current status of the Apple-HTC dispute is unknown to me). In contrast, the fact that a patent on general display concepts is even deemed valid, much less worthy of an infringement award of over $200M is just plain nuts.

    @A
    East Texas courts – judges and juries – are known for their favoritism towards patent holders. As a result, patent trolls swarm to east Texas to pursue alleged cases of patent infringement.

  2. Given the magnitude of the verdict, an appeal by Apple is a certainty. It is still unclear to me why other companies can market products that are superficially very similar to an iPhone in form and function with apparent impunity (caveat – the current status of the Apple-HTC dispute is unknown to me). In contrast, the fact that a patent on general display concepts is even deemed valid, much less worthy of an infringement award of over $200M is just plain nuts.

    @A
    East Texas courts – judges and juries – are known for their favoritism towards patent holders. As a result, patent trolls swarm to east Texas to pursue alleged cases of patent infringement.

Reader Feedback

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.