RUMOR: Apple will use baseband from CDMA inventor Qualcomm for iPhone 5 and iPad 2

Apple Store“A report out of the Far East early Thursday claims that Apple has decided on its lineup of component suppliers for the fifth-generation iPhone and second-generation iPad — both of which will reportedly obtain baseband chips from CDMA inventor Qualcomm,” AppleInsider reports.

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“Though the latest report Thursday by Taipei’s Economic Daily News does not insinuate that the alleged Qualcomm design win will lead to a CDMA (Verizon or Sprint) iPhone, there have been other anecdotal pieces of evidence to that end, like AppleInsider’s discovery of a cryptic ‘iPhone developer guru’ job posting on the Qualcomm website in August,” AppleInsider reports. “Meanwhile, that same report also claims knowledge of over a half-dozen other iPhone 5 and iPad 2 component suppliers.”

Read more in the full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Readers “Fred Mertz” and “Dan K.” for the heads up.]

22 Comments

  1. Greg,

    Apple has developed a CDMA phone long ago, and has been testing it. There is no reason why they wouldn’t do it. CDMA is not the dominant mobile technology today (GSM is), but neither is it marginal. Currently, I believe it represents almost 20% of global mobile addressable market, and a lot of it is in developed (US) or developing (Latin America, China) world. No company would every purposely ignore 20% of your possible market if the costs to address that market are negligible. Let us not forget, other handset makers have been making CDMA phones for a very long time, and many of their models were offered in two flavours (GSM and CDMA). Implementing the CDMA radio chip in a mobile phone has been done many times. Apple does NOT need to re-invent the wheel on this one. The components aren’t much more expensive than the GSM ones.

    The only issue related to CDMA may be the proper implementation of the standard. Under most common implementation, it is not possible to use voice and data at the same time. However, this is not the limitation of carriers’ networks; it is just the way handsets implement the technology. All Apple needs to do is implement CDMA properly to enable simultaneous voice and data.

    I can see the previously CDMA iPhones going to the Chinese market, as one of their major operators has a large CDMA network.

  2. Greg,

    Apple has developed a CDMA phone long ago, and has been testing it. There is no reason why they wouldn’t do it. CDMA is not the dominant mobile technology today (GSM is), but neither is it marginal. Currently, I believe it represents almost 20% of global mobile addressable market, and a lot of it is in developed (US) or developing (Latin America, China) world. No company would every purposely ignore 20% of your possible market if the costs to address that market are negligible. Let us not forget, other handset makers have been making CDMA phones for a very long time, and many of their models were offered in two flavours (GSM and CDMA). Implementing the CDMA radio chip in a mobile phone has been done many times. Apple does NOT need to re-invent the wheel on this one. The components aren’t much more expensive than the GSM ones.

    The only issue related to CDMA may be the proper implementation of the standard. Under most common implementation, it is not possible to use voice and data at the same time. However, this is not the limitation of carriers’ networks; it is just the way handsets implement the technology. All Apple needs to do is implement CDMA properly to enable simultaneous voice and data.

    I can see the previously CDMA iPhones going to the Chinese market, as one of their major operators has a large CDMA network.

  3. Predrag is right, and all of this goes to explain why we won’t be seeing Sprint or Verizon iPhones until some major changes happen among the American cellular carriers.

    Verizon has a network that is robust enough to handle iPhones, but they are holding out for more money and control. There are no signs that those policies have changed.

    Sprint would probably meet Apple’s terms for money and control, but its network is not robust enough to handle the demands that the iPhone would place upon it. The scattershot way the company is deploying 4G technology does not create a lot of confidence that Sprint’s philosophy of network expansion will change anytime soon.

  4. Predrag is right, and all of this goes to explain why we won’t be seeing Sprint or Verizon iPhones until some major changes happen among the American cellular carriers.

    Verizon has a network that is robust enough to handle iPhones, but they are holding out for more money and control. There are no signs that those policies have changed.

    Sprint would probably meet Apple’s terms for money and control, but its network is not robust enough to handle the demands that the iPhone would place upon it. The scattershot way the company is deploying 4G technology does not create a lot of confidence that Sprint’s philosophy of network expansion will change anytime soon.

  5. The technical problems of making a CDMA phone is not the problem.

    The problem is confusion for the user. Apple doesn’t like giving you too many choices (because you may choose that you don’t need an iPhone at all!)

    Apple won’t sell a CDMA phone, not because they can’t, but because they don’t want to.

  6. The technical problems of making a CDMA phone is not the problem.

    The problem is confusion for the user. Apple doesn’t like giving you too many choices (because you may choose that you don’t need an iPhone at all!)

    Apple won’t sell a CDMA phone, not because they can’t, but because they don’t want to.

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